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Topic: Treehoppers from Ecuador | Author: boghaunter1 | Replies: 2 | Views: 10
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kevinkk
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Re: Treehoppers from Ecuador

by kevinkk » Tue Feb 07, 2023 7:21 am

Some of those youtube videos are good, and they show interesting animals, I just watched a butterfly one where the narrator claimed birdwings
lived in Pakistan. He didn't even mention the Solomon islands. Not exactly what I'd call learning material, but it can be junk food.
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 2 | Views: 9
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Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by kevinkk » Tue Feb 07, 2023 7:14 am

I don't think any problems exist, each year is different, people don't always advertise livestock. Some times you need to post a want
ad, and even then it's a crapshoot. I've found that over the last ten years or so, a large variety of natives have been offered, it's just that
life isn't a production line, and sometimes there's a period where you have to wait for ova, rather than being able to buy diapaused material.
I'll be out this season, and something will fly in, what, where and when -
I keep a notebook of traders and just recently bought material from someone I emailed and asked if they had anything, a successful endeavor,
despite my want ads. Shipping is work, I know I don't come out ahead when I sell livestock, I suppose that's my own fault, but it's just a hobby.
I sure wouldn't import US natives from the EU, if you're desperate- try Ebay.
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 2 | Views: 9
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What's up with US Saturniidae?

by lamprima2 » Tue Feb 07, 2023 6:28 am

Once in a while, I purchase a few cocoons of very trivial overwintering N. American Saturniidae: H. cecropia. and A. polyphemus, just for fun. This year I can not find any. I really do not feel like importing them from UK or France. Did something happen to these species in the US, or this is just a "supply-demand" thing - a common explanation of all possible problems nowadays? Can anyone tell me the name of a reliable breeder in the US?
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 14 | Views: 230
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Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by eurytides » Tue Feb 07, 2023 6:01 am

Here are the first instar larvae

Topic: Treehoppers from Ecuador | Author: boghaunter1 | Replies: 2 | Views: 10
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Treehoppers from Ecuador

by boghaunter1 » Tue Feb 07, 2023 5:06 am

Hello all,

Ran across this interesting video on Youtube about treehoppers... those often bizarre, tiny little plant suckers that can have amazing adornments projecting from their thoraxes. I think many of us will never get a chance to see some of these in real life & this video is quite educational & entertaining at times. I hope our own moderator member by the same avatar name gets a kick out of it ;) (unless, of course... he has already seen it!).



John K.
Topic: Mini-monsters... | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 2 | Views: 14
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Re: Mini-monsters...

by Trehopr1 » Tue Feb 07, 2023 4:51 am

In the dark, dank, spaces of caves, hollowed out trees,
and deep crevices of rocky outcroppings danger lurks
everywhere and hapless insects fall prey to apparitions
evolved for an existence of surprise and concealment.

Another of natures "mini-monsters" of the underworld
are the Amblypygi: an ancient order of arachnid chelicerate
arthropods (also known as whip spiders or tailless whip
scorpiones). There are presently some 17 named genera
with approximately 155 species.

Most are seldom if ever encountered by most people.
Though, harmless to humans they are intimidating-looking
creatures to encounter and most of us would likely shy
away from any chance encounter.

Members of the family Phrynidae contain some of the
real heavyweights amongst these and the genus: Phryna
in particular has several.

Here is a fairly colossal example taken in a Peruvian
cave in 1972.

Image
Topic: From pinned to riker? | Author: akraider | Replies: 3 | Views: 78
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Re: From pinned to riker?

by akraider » Tue Feb 07, 2023 4:28 am

Thanks for the reply...did you rehydrate the specimen(s) a bit before putting them in the Riker?
Topic: Papilio polyxenes gynandromorph | Author: chrisw | Replies: 10 | Views: 240
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Re: Papilio polyxenes gynandromorph

by mothman55 » Tue Feb 07, 2023 3:52 am

That has to be the best deal for $20 I have ever seen. Very unique gynandromorph.
Topic: Mini-monsters... | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 2 | Views: 14
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Mini-monsters...

by Trehopr1 » Tue Feb 07, 2023 12:44 am

Thru the years of my inordinate fondness for
all things multi-legged I have occasionally gone
off "on a tangent" or diverted from primary focus
to dabble a bit in things that MOST would find
un-nerving or frightful.

So, my next photograph is an example of one of
my "momentary lapses of reason" or focus.

Image

Giant centipedes or scolopenders are ferocious
predators in their realm. They are quite able-bodied
and fast enough to overpower anything that comes
close. The largest ones have no fear of tarantulas,
small rodents, snakes, or other underground dwellers.

It is well known that they are capable of delivering
a painful venomous bite that you won't forget; and,
their (general) un-nerving appearance and speed
capabilities means you don't want one getting inside
the dwelling you sleep in.

For those curious about that BIG one well, I personally
caught that superb beastie in early August 1990. It
was seen crossing a desert road in early morning in
Pedernales province. A nearby cave located amongst
a rocky "outcropping" told of the most likely abode
of this mini-monster....
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 14 | Views: 230
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Paul K
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Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Paul K » Tue Feb 07, 2023 12:38 am

Trehopr1 wrote: Mon Feb 06, 2023 11:48 pm
Must have been a BIG thrill to see this species arrive
at your light sheets.

Do you think you could post us a picture of this personal
grand capture ?
I don’t have a photo as I didn’t collect it. It was worn specimen and I let it go ( most likely it became a meal for birds next morning ) . I do have video clip but it’s recorded on VHS tape and I never had the chance to transfer to more recent format.

My specimen was purchased 6 years later at the Toronto insect fair which was organized for many years by Ken Thorne. Suddenly the fair was not profitable anymore and he discontinued and no one else attempt to organize anything these days.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 14 | Views: 230
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Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Trehopr1 » Mon Feb 06, 2023 11:48 pm

Fasinating information Paul K.
I've never heard anything about breeding attempts !

Must have been a BIG thrill to see this species arrive
at your light sheets.

Do you think you could post us a picture of this personal
grand capture ?

How exactly does one even grasp this moth when its
wings are outstretched ? Best to net it then grasp and
inject ?
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 14 | Views: 230
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Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Paul K » Mon Feb 06, 2023 11:15 pm

eurytides wrote: Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:06 pm All these female specimens and yet no one has taken the time to get eggs and rear. We still don’t know the life history of this species, which isn’t even that rare.
Peter Mollmaan who lives in Bolivia also known from YouTube Chanel pedromariposa tried to rear them. He obtained eggs from few females but his attempt failed.
Young caterpillars refused to eat many different type of plants that were suggested as possible food plant.
Few started to feed but shortly after died.

Indeed the species is common. I my self encountered only one specimen in French Guiana while moth collecting but I was at the end of the pic season for Thysania.
Topic: Anteos maerula | Author: daveuk | Replies: 4 | Views: 48
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Re: Anteos maerula

by adamcotton » Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:29 pm

daveuk wrote: Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:21 pm Interesting that in this book the common name is " giant brimstone"
Probably the author called it that because he was British, and the shape and colour reminded him of Gonepteryx rhamni, unless it was already called that before he wrote the book.

Adam.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 14 | Views: 230
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Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Trehopr1 » Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:22 pm

Indeed, eurytides I agree.
The species is an "enigma" in that manner. One would think after all these years we would have a better knowledge of this mammoth species !

We didn't waste any time getting to know the life history O. alexandrea; but, then again that's a butterfly.
Topic: Anteos maerula | Author: daveuk | Replies: 4 | Views: 48
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Re: Anteos maerula

by daveuk » Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:21 pm

It does occur on some Carribean Islands Trehopr but not the Dominican Republic according to my book on Butterflies of the West Indies. Interesting that in this book the common name is " giant brimstone"
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Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 14 | Views: 230
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Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by eurytides » Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:06 pm

All these female specimens and yet no one has taken the time to get eggs and rear. We still don’t know the life history of this species, which isn’t even that rare.
Topic: Anteos maerula | Author: daveuk | Replies: 4 | Views: 48
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Re: Anteos maerula

by Trehopr1 » Mon Feb 06, 2023 9:01 pm

Beautiful species Dave ! 🎉☺️
Much like a "supersized" brimstone. 😲

I don't recall this species being in the Dominican Republic but, it may be there.

I have a bunch of Dominican butterflies I can show that were all self-collected if anyone cares to see them...
Topic: Other People's Things.... | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 9 | Views: 106
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Re: Other People's Things....

by daveuk » Mon Feb 06, 2023 8:49 pm

Some more real gems here. All beautifully presented.
The lycaenids are incredible.
Topic: Other People's Things.... | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 9 | Views: 106
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Re: Other People's Things....

by Trehopr1 » Mon Feb 06, 2023 8:41 pm

Here I additionally show a sampling of
some of my European/North African
holdings. Some incredible diversity from
the Neartic zone !

Whenever possible, I try to gather (like)
groups togather in one drawer (examples
are Morpho's or Lycaenidae -- as shown).

However, this just is not possible at all times
so, I wind up pulling togather that which
seems to (mix) well togather in a drawer for
a pleasing "eye-candy" result.

I don't pursue this avenue with everything I
have as I do have a portion of my collection
dedicated to "unit trays"/drawers as well as
other drawers dedicated to entire (series) of
species which I have collected personally.

Image

Image

Image
Topic: Anteos maerula | Author: daveuk | Replies: 4 | Views: 48
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Anteos maerula

by daveuk » Mon Feb 06, 2023 8:32 pm

This very beautiful species is reputedly common over most of it's range. Despite this it seems to be rarely offered for sale.
A male from Mexico & a pair from El Salvador. I have females which are much paler. Almost white
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