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Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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adamcotton
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by adamcotton » Tue Jun 25, 2024 7:46 pm

kevinkk wrote: Tue Jun 25, 2024 2:45 am What is considered "high humidity"?
Humidity can reach almost 100% during the rainy season here in Thailand, and is mostly about 80% at that time (May to October here in the north), but may be higher in average in the south. On the other hand humidity gets relatively low from mid February to mid April when it is normally hot and dry. I have air conditioning in my room that keeps humidity down to about 20% or less, even when it's really high just outside the door.

My Korean visitor told me that in Korea and Japan the humidity is very high (almost 100% much of the time) during the summer, and very few people had air conditioning until recently, and many people still do not.

Adam.
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by Panacanthus » Tue Jun 25, 2024 4:13 pm

adamcotton wrote: Mon Jun 24, 2024 5:50 pm I have a Korean Lepidopterist visiting me today, and he mentioned that he always puts water-soluble glue on the underside of the wing bases after removing freshly spread specimens from the relaxing board. He explained that if he doesn't do that the wings either 'spring' or droop in the high humidity in summer. He also stated that the ones that droop rather than spring have rotten muscle tissue.

Adam.
I’m surprised the water soluble glue itself is not negatively affected by the high humidity, and is able to hold the wings in position! It seems a solvent based glue or an epoxy would be more reliable (although those would also be more permanent if one ever wished to change the wing positions in the future), but it must work for him. I’m also surprised the water soluble glue doesn’t at least partially “re-relax” the wing joint when applied, as it seems that it would be water based. It would be interesting to know more about this particular adhesive. Perhaps it is not water based, but is still water soluble.
“Seems to me the natural world is the greatest source of excitement; the greatest source of visual beauty; the greatest source of intellectual interest. It is the greatest source of so much in life that makes life worth living.” -David Attenborough
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by kevinkk » Tue Jun 25, 2024 2:45 am

This has been an interesting read. What is considered "high humidity"? In my house right now it's 53%. That's probably only because it's the mostly
dry season on the coast, as opposed to the mostly wet season. I have noticed some wing movement in some dried material.
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by Annarobertson1947 » Tue Jun 25, 2024 12:12 am

Of course, understand fully, i had an Agrias narcissus that totally collapsed upon relaxing , in ornithoptera we used to call it "Jungle rot"
Topic: Where did our Colorado members go? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 208
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Re: Where did our Colorado members go?

by evra » Mon Jun 24, 2024 7:01 pm

Although I don't live there, right about now would be around the peak of the blacklighting season in the mountains for things like Hyalophora gloveri and Agapema homogena. It's a bit too early for great Hemileuca collecting, which would probably be in early to mid-August. 2 years ago it was absolutely crazy.
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by adamcotton » Mon Jun 24, 2024 5:50 pm

I have a Korean Lepidopterist visiting me today, and he mentioned that he always puts water-soluble glue on the underside of the wing bases after removing freshly spread specimens from the relaxing board. He explained that if he doesn't do that the wings either 'spring' or droop in the high humidity in summer. He also stated that the ones that droop rather than spring have rotten muscle tissue.

Adam.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 145 | Views: 579072
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Mon Jun 24, 2024 1:42 pm

21june2024: zero observed.

22june2024: zero observed. Started on the south shore of Lake Ontario; 71F milkweed 50% bloom. Nothing. Went to a well forested park south of Rochester NY, 84F, milkweed 85% bloom. Nothing. But I did get to reconnect with urban and suburban drivers: throwing rubbish out auto windows, make 4-lane changes, left lane bandits, looking at their phone. No wonder I hate urban areas, they're just self-centered, garbage people.

23june2024: Stormy. None observed.

eta: first actias luna of the year last night to BLB. Back in the olden days they'd be long finished by now.

Back on Tigers: while looking at old notes for luna observations, I'd forgotten some notes I had on Tigers:

29May1989: Thousand Acre Swamp, Penfield NY: p glaucus

05-07june1989: Finger Lakes region NY: P glaucus very common

07july1989: [interesting:] "P glaucus still occur, fresh". "still occur" noted because back then, by July Tigers were rarely found.



16may1990, Finger Lakes NY: 1st P glaucus, 80F

26may1990, Sodus Point NY: 1st P glaucus, 70F sunny

02june1990, Finger Lakes NY: glaucus common

14june1990, Finger Lakes NY: P glaucus "very common"



10june1997: Alaska: "Papilio glaucus [note: it's canadensis] common along Rt. 3 (George Parks Highway north of Sheep Creek.) 24C partly cloudy.

12june1997: Homer, AK: saw one Papilio "glaucus" [canadensis]

19june1997: Fingerlakes region, NY: "observed first P. glaucus"; 24C sunny
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by Annarobertson1947 » Sun Jun 23, 2024 11:30 pm

adamcotton wrote: Sun Jun 23, 2024 4:16 pm I assume this was a way to counter the high humidity in the air in Japan for much of the year, which would otherwise cause specimen wings to 'spring'.

Adam.
Of course, i wasn't thinking about that
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Re: Japanese collectors habits

by adamcotton » Sun Jun 23, 2024 4:16 pm

I assume this was a way to counter the high humidity in the air in Japan for much of the year, which would otherwise cause specimen wings to 'spring'.

Adam.
Topic: Japanese collectors habits | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 8 | Views: 225
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Japanese collectors habits

by Annarobertson1947 » Sun Jun 23, 2024 7:34 am

Just wondering if anyone had any views on a collection habit i found with a lot of Japanese butterfly collectors in that they used to apply glue to underside wing joints in a lot of older collections.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 303
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by wollastoni » Sat Jun 22, 2024 9:02 am

In France, we have the entomology auctions (about 4 sales per year) where important old collections are sold drawers by drawers in auctions. Everyone is happy : collectors (including Museums) get the species they study without having to buy the whole collection, seller (or his family) get a lot of money, the specimens remain curated by passionated entomologists.
You should try to organize that in the US too.

Big museums accept only very few collections and small museums are not a good place to place your beloved collection.
Topic: Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs... | Author: gry | Replies: 2 | Views: 69
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Re: Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs...

by livingplanet3 » Sat Jun 22, 2024 4:29 am

gry wrote: Sat Jun 22, 2024 2:13 am This thing was very small, only about a centimeter across. I thought it was a spider, but I only see six legs. Spotted today in Green Bay, WI.
Definitely a spider, but missing two legs. It looks somewhat like it might be in the genus Philodromus, but that's really just a guess -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/485640/bgimage
Topic: Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs... | Author: gry | Replies: 2 | Views: 69
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Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs...

by gry » Sat Jun 22, 2024 2:13 am

This thing was very small, only about a centimeter across. I thought it was a spider, but I only see six legs. Spotted today in Green Bay, WI.
DSCN7377.JPG
DSCN7377.JPG (193.49 KiB) Viewed 69 times
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 303
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by vabrou » Fri Jun 21, 2024 11:52 pm

alandmore, actually I began talks with (LSAM) Louisiana State Arthropod Museum concerning the the placement of our master collection around a half century ago. And I have had continuing discussions with the past three museum directors and several curators over these decades. But, I have made over 16 annual sizeable donations there (LSAM) going back to 1971, which already currently amounts to about a 1/4 million top quality Louisiana insect specimens. Our greatest numbers of donated insects insects in the USA amounted to more than 124,301 specimens to the (FSCA, from 1971-2015) The Florida State Collection of Arthropods, Gainesville ,Fla. I say more than because we have lost our official donations records for 17 annual donations over the past 55 years due to a fire, a flood, and several hurricanes. We have used our USA donations as part of our state and Federal tax write-offs since 1971, and this is why we had these donations independently appraised. Donations made to museums out of the US are not usable for tax write offs purposes, so appraisals for worldwide donations were unnecessary and served no legitimate purpose. We made 56 individual donations of insects specimens over the past 55 years just here in the US. And you may ask, have we ever been audited by the IRS. The answer is yes, and the results of that one audit resulted in a further refund to us of over $800.00 USD. Seems I was overly cautious and shorted myself in my calculations and documentation. I was worried before the audit, but was surprised post audit at the final results. Worried, because we always filed our own annual taxes for many decades and without any training, and mistakes can happen anywhere in this process. Things to remember if you are ever audited by the IRS, 1. You are not required to personally make an appearance, but you can hire someone to represent you at the audit. And that is exactly what we did, we hired an accountant for $200.00 to represent us, a retired IRS employee. She made two 100 mile round trips to the IRS office for us, and we created an eight-page document explaining our near half century of entomological research, subsequent hundreds of scientific publications based upon these biological materials, and the related annual donations and appraisals. When the audit was over we paid our $200.00 fee to our representative, and pocketed $600.00 we weren't expecting before the audit. And we never personally made an appearance to the IRS. The importance of not showing up is so that when questions are asked during the audit, your representative can respond with the words 'I don't know'. You on the other hand have to answer all questions if you appear in person at the audit. I have never heard of anyone coming out of an audit by receiving more money. Key words, document, document, document, and plan, plan and plan. My wife and I are both 75 and we can no longer collect and operate our traps and equipment as we have done for the past 55 years. As for all the traps, equipment etc, we have been selling some, giving away some to fellow collectors now for the past three years. And so far we are holding on to our master research collection as we still have 600+ manuscripts in various states of completion. We are always submitting dozens of manuscripts for publication yearly. I have some rather large manuscripts I have been working on, some in process for over several decades. Hopefully I can remain with the living to submit some of them.

Chuck, currently (right now) the McGuire Center in Fla. has no room for any more insects. Though, that matter is always negotiable depending upon the details of who, what, where, when and how. The last place you would want to place your biological materials at, is in the states of New York and California, and placing them in a smaller museum, you may want to save yourself a lot of trouble and unrecouped expense by just setting them ablaze now. What ever assurances you get now from a museum are meaningless; just look at what the communist have done to our entire country in just a few years. Here today, gone tomorrow. Look at the burning of Brazilian museums that have been repositories for tens of thousands of irreplaceable TYPES for centuries, all totally gone because of incompetency by the museum's management. And likewise in Europe in World-wars I and II, entire museums and their centuries of irreplaceable contents bombed to ashes in many countries. Museum workers die, retire, loose interest, and funding is never secure for the future care of your priceless materials. For these reasons we have all along published our findings in print with back-up data and with a selection of images so the future researchers can have an understanding of what were actually reporting upon. Websites are temporary and fluid, always changing and non-permanent, --ALL OF THEM. Websites come and websites go, as the first instance of annual hosting fees not being paid, those websites magically disappear overnight. Text without representative images is almost worthless. Remember 'one photo is worth a thousand words'.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 303
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by alandmor » Fri Jun 21, 2024 11:11 pm

I have been pondering some of these same issues as well lately. In addition to finding a suitable location to donate a collection, it’s also imperative that your spouse, family, or other heirs know your wishes in case something should happen to you unexpectedly. Too many collections have become orphaned and neglected when the owner passes away and family members have no idea what to do with it. Towards that end, we recently updated our living trust to include a section that my collection, references, textbooks, microscopes, miscellaneous supplies etc., be donated to the M.C. James Entomological Collection at Washington State University where I received an MS in Entomology. It includes names and contact information of current museum staff. I recently stopped by WSU on a road trip and met with the curator and director of the museum to discuss a future major collection donation and brought some miscellaneous specimens to donate. It’s also not uncommon these days for an institution to ask for a financial donation as well to help cover the cost of curating, housing, and maintaining any donated specimens. My hope is that it will be a while yet before I decide that I no longer can or have the desire to maintain it myself, but if I am run over by the proverbial bus tomorrow, at least there is a place for it to go and people to contact should the unexpected happen.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 303
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by Chuck » Fri Jun 21, 2024 5:18 pm

58chevy wrote: Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:01 pm My collection is not large enough (less than 100 drawers) or specific enough (no specialty species in large numbers) to be of interest to a major institution.
Have you asked? As I'd mentioned, museums in, for example, Florida or NY may have interest in your material. Smithsonian I hear wants more specimens.
Topic: What has changed recently with importing? | Author: daffodildeb | Replies: 14 | Views: 3977
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Re: What has changed recently with importing?

by Chuck » Fri Jun 21, 2024 5:16 pm

^^ Vernon, you are absolutely right.

BUT you can beat the rap but not the ride. That's part of the game. That SCOTUS ruling has the potential straighten out government- but it will not happen voluntarily. And the plaintiff in that case was bankrolled for millions of dollars.

If USFWS elects to seize $1000 of anything, sure you can fight it, and all the way to SCOTUS. Do you have the money? A lawyer is going to want over $1000 just to start with...so at that point you're even and beyond it you're losing money.

Government plays this game all the time. The other part of the game is called "seized for evidence" which means they take the laptop you need, your insect collection, your phone that you need to call a lawyer, etc. And in five years you MIGHT get that stuff back.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 303
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by alandmor » Fri Jun 21, 2024 4:56 pm

vabrou wrote: Thu Jun 20, 2024 11:39 pm We have all along been pursued by museums far and near. At this point, we are tired.

Vernon, if I may ask, what plans do you have for such an extensive and valuable collection and all the equipment and supplies you've accumulated over the years once you're no longer able to or interested in maintaining it all?
Topic: What has changed recently with importing? | Author: daffodildeb | Replies: 14 | Views: 3977
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Re: What has changed recently with importing?

by vabrou » Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:03 pm

[size=150]daffodildeb, apparently you haven't searched this subject in this forum nor many other worldwide such forums. Here is a recent link in insectnet forum, read it, you may learn something: Bottom line = unless you are engaged in a full time commercial official business of selling insects, YOU DON"T NEED ANY PERMITS WHATSOEVER TO SEND OR RECEIVE INSECTS in or out of the USA, nor have you ever been required to do so.............. Occasional insect sales by hobbyist is not an official business. I have shipped and received far more than 700,000 insects in/out of the USA over the past 60 years. If you have been paying attention the recent US Supreme court decision which has just unanimously outlawed the decades of attempts by the acronym agency 'ATF' attempting to outlaw gun ownership by US citizens. link I mentioned - viewtopic.php?t=1564&sid=74f0e9c261a6bf ... eadbbcc886 This means that all of the ever expanding acronym U.S. government agencies, e.g. FBI, CIA, IRS, FWS, USDA, ATF, US Postal Service, US Forest Service, on and on and on, do not have any authority to make any such laws or regulations upon the citizens of the U.S. There will soon be many more US Supreme court decisions specifically individually addressing each and all of these similar acronym bureaucracies in the US government based upon the very same arguments just handed down unanimously by the US Supreme court. Bottom line, only the US Congress has the authority to make and enforce any and all such regulations and laws upon citizens of the USA, and so far they have not. If you believe otherwise you have been an uninformed victim of elitist anecdotal BS, or are uneducated regarding the 'hows and whys' of our governing constitution, and/or not paying attention to current events. These all-encompassing 'copy and past' regulations across 200 countries of the world are all just a tiny part of a worldwide corrupt attempt to create a ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT which began over 40 years ago, the goal of which is to control everyone and everything on earth. WAKE UP!!! Want to know what happens when governments fall victim to communist and socialist governments, just look at all those countries existing today worldwide? In the US there are currently nearly three million federal employees, but add to that the numbers of state government workers for 50 states, 3,143 county and parish government agency workers, plus an additional 100 county-equivalents in U.S. territories, and unauthorized local self-appointed agencies and governing boards, then the numbers are mind-boggling. Remember what I have said publicly in past decades: NEVER, EVER CALL, SPEAK TO, OR ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR PERSONAL BUSINESS ACTIVITIES, OR RARE SPECIMENS YOU HAVE DISCOVERED, or specific data to locate such rarities WITH ANY GOVERNMENT OR UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEE FOR ANY REASONS WHATSOEVER. TO DO SO WILL RESULT IN YOUR EVENTUAL DEMISE, and/or financial penalties for you. Beyond making these suggestions, I can't fix STUPID. GOOD LUCK, your gonna need it. THINK BEFORE YOU LEAP, AND HANG UP THAT DAMN PHONE, and more importantly DON'T E-MAIL ANYONE about such matters, and DON"T EVER DISCUSS THESE MATTERS ON SOCIAL MEDIA, like so many novices do. LIMIT YOUR PUBLIC PERSONA TO OFFICIAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH aspect of your activities. REMEMBER GOOGLE is WATCHING AND SAVING EVERY WORD YOU HAVE OR WILL POST PUBLICLY OR PRIVATELY, EVEN IF YOU DON'T SPECIFICALLY USE GOOGLE. [/size]
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 303
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by 58chevy » Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:01 pm

My collection is not large enough (less than 100 drawers) or specific enough (no specialty species in large numbers) to be of interest to a major institution. My only options seem to be smaller institutions or "keep it in the family". I don't intend to sell it. Any other suggestions?