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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 144 | Views: 576343
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Chuck
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Thu Jun 20, 2024 6:02 pm

19june2024; 84F/29C sunny, humid.
Observed: 0
Screw this, I didn't go out. I'm tired of tromping around in the sun for nothing. I saw two this week, so the week gets checked off.

20june2024: 88F/31C sunny, humid.
Observed 1; captured 1
I'm not going to the field today either. Forget it. So I ran errands. Pulling onto our dead-end street I saw a Tiger fly across the road, and alight! I pulled over, grabbed my net and jumped out. It flitted from flowers to flowers on a Elderberry. I caught it.

Image
NYON_HOM_240620

So, what is it- Spring Form, or MST? The black abdominal band seems awfully narrow for Spring Form.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 31
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by 58chevy » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:41 pm

I'm in the same boat you're in. I have been corresponding with a small natural history museum in my area. The director is a PhD entomoligist and is eager to expand the museum's insect collection. I'm not ready to let go of my collection yet because I can still maintain it on my own. I'm also still able to do field collecting on a regular basis. But when I can no longer do those things I'll reluctantly donate it to the museum or to my kids, who are not entomologists but are interested in the collection. I also have a fairly good entomological library that includes a few antique books. The library will likely go with the collection. But I still enjoy collecting and will probably regret it if I give away the collection sooner than I have to.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 31
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by kevinkk » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:29 pm

None of us expected to get old, I know I was feeling indestructible until my mid 50's, now, not so much.
I have slightly similar concerns, albeit on a far smaller scale.
The books should hold interest and value, a lot of publications are OOP, and still relevant.
My collection is not museum worthy, unless it's some hole in the wall, assuming there is even space, I've seen random cases
in different places, but not worthy of the time many members put into their efforts.
Our things will always mean more to us than others, and there's no way around that.
If I had a lot of papered material, I might try a seller of deadstock for purchasing, it's a logical choice.
Best wishes with your efforts, and to everyone else that time is sneaking up on.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 31
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by Trehopr1 » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:22 pm

Chuck, I imagine wherever you may move to there will be some kind of space which you can use as a hobby room (perhaps a part of a basement space or a smaller third bedroom). It is here that you could save yourself what you regard as "the best for last".

I think you mentioned once that you have around 100 insect drawers. So, maybe say to yourself I'm going to keep 20 or 25 (for example). Those will have the things that YOU personally treasure most. All the rest is then set aside for sale or donation. Then do the same with your remaining insect books in that you keep only those you still enjoy the most. Maybe they only fill one bookshelf or less. Something that again will still fit in a smaller allotted space.

Your collection is as much a part of you as you are a part of it. This has been a lifelong travel. Why not still do a smaller measure of it in your retirement years ? You could still continue enjoying it as one of your hobbies only in a smaller (bite/portion).

Once you have set aside what you really want in both specimens and books then you might try having an "open house" weekend or week where fellow collectors could come out and purchase from you the specimens, books, or drawers that you are willing to part with.

This way no need for any shipping or complaints about mail damage. Prospective buyers see what they have before them and accept it as is and with a price that you can accept. Maybe some package deals or "bundling".

Then with that task out of the way you will see what you have left and you can then decide the further disposition of the specimens and books. Maybe by then you will have already decided where the unwanted things may go.

Additionally, you could try reaching out to collectors and colleagues you know well. See what they may be interested in and just have them pay you an off visit at their convenience. Likely some more sales and the chance to meet-up.

These are just my initial thoughts about downsizing your collection sensibly.

There's certainly nothing wrong with "re-purposing" some of your specimens and books to those fellow collectors/enthusiasts who would truly APPRECIATE having them to add to their collections and to enjoy for many years.

You might be surprised how quickly things will disappear when people have a chance to actually see it and hold it etc.
Topic: Rove Beetle Biochemistry | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 1 | Views: 10
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 31
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Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by Chuck » Thu Jun 20, 2024 3:04 pm

We're moving in less than a year, and before that I have to drastically downsize my reference collection and library. I thought I had a thread on this, but in searching both here and the archives it looks like my concerns and challenges are spread all over.

It is virtually assured that 30 years from now I will own nothing, including my lifelong reference collection. It's rather melancholy looking at specimens I caught as a kid, or specimens that represent a great period in my life, and to think they need to go away. Each one has memories that are recalled, taking me back to a "better time" LOL which they all are, in hindsight, right? It's worse perhaps than giving away decades of photo memories.

Another challenge is WHAT to dispose of. It's my experience that whatever I give away- be it a tool or bug or whatever- I soon need it. If I were to dispose of the entire collection, it's guaranteed that whatever my next project is, I'll need something I gave away, and that something will be 1000 miles away. Too, I wonder if I give it ALL away, will I just quit? Why continue?

Books. I took all my general field guides (Golden Nature, Audobon, etc.) plus a number of "picture book" types to Goodwill, hoping they entice some youth to become interested.

What about the old and expensive ID guides? Scott, Howe, LeMaire, Opler, Covell, etc. Is there a market of buyers for these outdated volumes? Every institution I've been in has stacks of D'Abrera and all the others; they don't want more books. I've seen stacks of books left behind when a collection goes to an institution; ditto LepSoc and TropLep publications.

What about antique books? Howard, Holland, etc. Does anyone collect antique insect books anymore or have they gone the way of depression glass- unwanted.

Turning back to specimens, well they have to go somewhere. But what I hear about so many institutions leaves me wondering which are a viable repository? Variously I've been told about institutional places: the insect collection is self-funding, the organization wants to dump or downsize the collection, the collection isn't maintained, staff has dropped from 11 to 2, their funding dried up, there's in-fighting and things are turbulent, the organization wants to repatriate specimens to locations that can't sustain them, you name it. Scary...it's like keeping an institutional insect collection these days is a battle...which will survive?

One collections manager remarked to me: "more collectors in their will indicate where the collection should NOT go than indicate where it should go." That was interesting. That's not my case- OH! But wait- not to Bishop, those idiots, not my hard earned material.

Chris Grinter, IIRC, made a good point that a collection, or parts of, should go to wherever they're not from; ie an eastern USA collection should go to the west coast because the east coast institutions already have most of those specimens.

I've heard rumor, though not heard or read it myself, that some institutions are qualifying potential donations- in other words, they might decline. Any truth to this? All collections I've seen are sitting on thousands of papered specimens 100+ years old; they can't even keep up with papered material over the course of a century! Too, I've repeatedly been told NO MORE POLYPHEMUS! NO MORE POLYXENES! Most if not all museums/ collections already have enough, so FYI if you have ten drawers of polyphemus. Probably ditto for Ornithoptera, I've seen drawer after drawer of Ornithoptera.

I still am sitting on now-expensive purchased specimens from 1970s and 1980s. I have no time to get rid of these, and if I did I just can't deal with the sniveling types who complain that a leg broke in shipment. We tried that with my hundreds of vinyl LPs; sure we probably averaged about $10 each, but the buyers knew every complaint and scam to get their money back- and never return the LP! I ended up dumping them for .50 each in one lot. I can't deal with the same with butterfly buyers. Has anyone unloaded material to Butterfly Company or the like?

I'd be inclined to keep the collection until past the point I can't care for it; seen that plenty of times. But since we're moving the issue is somewhat being forced. I can't believe I'm this old, I don't feel old most of the time; I still slog through fields in stupifying heat and humidity. But numbers don't lie, and neither does the wife when she points out we're going to lose 1,000sq.ft.

My apologies if you've read most of this before. I'm rather rehashing for myself as I run out of time for contemplation.
Topic: Buying specimens in bulk for an entomology workshop | Author: nitinra | Replies: 9 | Views: 990
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Re: Buying specimens in bulk for an entomology workshop

by Chuck » Thu Jun 20, 2024 2:12 pm

I dispatched a box of Leps to Dr. Ravikanthachari for his students from the Flathead Tribe.

This is, to me, a great way to give back. Much of my current research is on Haudenosaunee tribal land, and throughout the years in the South Pacific my research was significantly enhanced by a number of the local native people.
Topic: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida? | Author: Hepialus | Replies: 4 | Views: 72
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Re: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida?

by Hepialus » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:51 am

58chevy wrote: Wed Jun 19, 2024 7:01 pm Check out the Keys Moths videos:
I am in contact with him. Going to talk with him tomorrow about where he gets best results.
Topic: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida? | Author: Hepialus | Replies: 4 | Views: 72
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Re: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida?

by 58chevy » Wed Jun 19, 2024 7:01 pm

Check out the Keys Moths videos:
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Re: Collecting moths in places not near home - how to bring equipment?

by 58chevy » Wed Jun 19, 2024 4:26 pm

Rather than haul your equipment with you, you could contact some local collectors and use their equipment. They could also serve as guides. If you don't know any locals, contact David Fine at keysmoths.com. He's a collector and knows others. You could also contact the McGuire Center for more info. A collector named Mark DeGrove lives in Punta Gorda. Many species in FL have multiple broods. There is no "off-season" there. You can find stuff even during winter months.
Topic: Where did our Colorado members go? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 139
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Re: Where did our Colorado members go?

by 58chevy » Wed Jun 19, 2024 4:02 pm

My son lives in CO Springs. He's not a collector but he sometimes catches bugs for me. I hope to do some collecting there soon. I'll be looking for CO hairstreaks. Let us know where you went and what you caught. If you're not aware of the May insect museum, it's worth a visit. Just outside of CO Springs.
Topic: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida? | Author: Hepialus | Replies: 4 | Views: 72
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Re: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida?

by Chuck » Wed Jun 19, 2024 11:40 am

Heliconius charithonia is ubiquitous in late summer. North of Orlando (at least) you can find hundreds in any field.

The others depend on location and time of year.

Florida is loaded with Wildlife Management Areas and many of what you seek can be found along the dirt roads.
Topic: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug? | Author: Parisix | Replies: 4 | Views: 77
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Re: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug?

by Parisix » Wed Jun 19, 2024 8:36 am

livingplanet3 wrote: Wed Jun 19, 2024 1:22 am
They certainly appear to be mites of the genus Ornithonyssus, most of which are parasites of birds, although some species are associated with rats -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/96991/bgimage

Most likely, they are coming from bird nests that have been built close your windows. I recall that there have been some posts about these mites to this forum, in times past.
Thank you so much! They definitely are those! We do have a bird's nest below the air conditioner output, but I never thought that if they had parasites they could go up to the window. We'll see what we can do to prevent these at least to enter the house...
Topic: Best places to light and/or net in South Florida? | Author: Hepialus | Replies: 4 | Views: 72
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Best places to light and/or net in South Florida?

by Hepialus » Wed Jun 19, 2024 5:37 am

Hello,

I am trying to find suitable spots for light trapping, and butterfly collecting, in South Florida.
Does anyone here know of anywhere particularly good? I am after Saturniidae, Arctiidae, Sphingidae especially, and for butterflies, mainly Papilionidae and rare Lycaenidae.

Species of particular interest are
Ascalapha odorata
Eumorpha sp.
Automeris io lilith
Composia fidelissima
Seirarctia echo
Cosmosoma sp.
Syntomeida sp.
Most other interesting moths too

all Papilionidae sp.
Eumaeus atala
Atlides halesus
Callophrys sp.
Chlorostrymon simaethis
Heliconius charithonia
perhaps other species too...


Essentially just looking for good places with lots of biodiversity.

Looking forward to assistance...
-
Jacob
Topic: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug? | Author: Parisix | Replies: 4 | Views: 77
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Re: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug?

by livingplanet3 » Wed Jun 19, 2024 1:22 am

Parisix wrote: Tue Jun 18, 2024 9:00 pm Hello everyone,
So I live in Spain (in Madrid precisely) and we've all of a sudden found a plague in our appartment. We first thought that it might be bedbugs, because we found it in the sofa, but looking at it more closely, it doesn't look like the species that is supposed to be associated to bedbugs (Cimex lectularius).
Plus we found a lot of them in the space between the inner and outer window, and they really seem to like my hair (which from what I've understood, isn't usually the case in bedbugs).
They are so little it's almost impossible to see them if you don't feel them in your skin or watch really closely, so it was really hard taking good picture of them. I've made a picture of one of them over my watch so that you can have an idea of the size of it.
Thank you in advance!...
They certainly appear to be mites of the genus Ornithonyssus, most of which are parasites of birds, although some species are associated with rats -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/96991/bgimage

Most likely, they are coming from bird nests that have been built close your windows. I recall that there have been some posts about these mites to this forum, in times past.
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Re: Collecting moths in places not near home - how to bring equipment?

by Paul K » Tue Jun 18, 2024 11:42 pm

I don’t think there are any restrictions in regards MV bulbs.
I always have it with me either in check in bag or carry on.
Topic: Where did our Colorado members go? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 139
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Re: Where did our Colorado members go?

by MikeH » Tue Jun 18, 2024 10:37 pm

Still here but haven't had much time to get out.

Here is a couple habitats photos from a high elevation grassland in South Park which had a decent flight of Oeneis alberta oslari.
Lost Park Rd
Park Co. CO
June 5, 2024
About 9,500 feet

Image
Image

And the target.
Image
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Re: Collecting moths in places not near home - how to bring equipment?

by Chuck » Tue Jun 18, 2024 9:11 pm

Oh- the general best collecting season in Florida is May-June; July is OK but winding down. Late July and August tend to be way past peak.
Topic: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug? | Author: Parisix | Replies: 4 | Views: 77
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Re: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug?

by Chuck » Tue Jun 18, 2024 9:10 pm

Can't tell from the top two photos, but the bottom look like baby jumping spiders.
Topic: What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug? | Author: Parisix | Replies: 4 | Views: 77
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What is this microscopic insect? Bedbug?

by Parisix » Tue Jun 18, 2024 9:00 pm

Hello everyone,
So I live in Spain (in Madrid precisely) and we've all of a sudden found a plague in our appartment. We first thought that it might be bedbugs, because we found it in the sofa, but looking at it more closely, it doesn't look like the species that is supposed to be associated to bedbugs (Cimex lectularius).
Plus we found a lot of them in the space between the inner and outer window, and they really seem to like my hair (which from what I've understood, isn't usually the case in bedbugs).
They are so little it's almost impossible to see them if you don't feel them in your skin or watch really closely, so it was really hard taking good picture of them. I've made a picture of one of them over my watch so that you can have an idea of the size of it.
Thank you in advance!
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