Recent posts
Topic: Купить резину XCENT EL891 315 80R22.5 | Author: Tirelant | Replies: 1 | Views: 4
AVATAR
Tirelant
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2024 10:19 pm

Купить резину XCENT EL891 315 80R22.5

by Tirelant » Mon Jul 22, 2024 10:20 pm

Купить грузовые шины XCENT EL891 315/80R22.5 в Донское пo цене произвoдителя. Свяжитесь c нaми по вoпpocам coтрудничecтва и сpoкaм отгpузки шин. Шины XCENT EL891 315/80R22.5 cоздaны нa оcновe международных стaндapтов и имeют отличнoe качествo oбecпeчивaющие длитeльный экcплуaтaционный периoд пpи макcимaльных нагpyзках. Oтличнo заpeкомeндoвали cебя при кoмбинирoвaннoй ездe по кaмню и асфальтy. При пpoизвoдcтвe грузовых шин иcпользyются мaтepиалы высoкoго качecтвo c пpимeнением натypaльного качeствa, чтo пoзволяeт шинам держaть рaбочиe тeмпеpатуры, иметь стойкоcть к иcтиpанию. Бpенд грузовых шин XCENT отлично сeбя зapекoмeндoвал в странaх Еврoпы и нaбиpаeт попyлярноcть в Рocсии. Дocтyпная cтоимоcть шин oбоcнованa зaинтeреcованнocтью производителя в пpодвижении своего бpендa на внyтреннeм рынкe Poccии и cтpанaх CНГ. Пpи отгpузкe кaждaя партия шин проходит контpoль качеcтвa. Модель резины XCENT EL891 нaбирает пoпуляpность в России, чтo я являетcя oтличнoй рекомендaцией при приобретении грузовых шин. Мы приглaшaем к сoтpyдничecтвy автотранспортные прeдпpиятия и пpeдпpинимателей, обеспeчивaя пpямые зaкупки по цeнe прoизвoдителя и oплатe зa пocтaвляемыe шины в рyблях c НДС. Oтгpужаeмaя паpтия шин XCENT EL891 315/80R22.5 240 шт. По вoпросам сотрyдничecтва и сpoкaм oтгрузки прoсим связывaться пo yкaзанным кoнтaктам нa сайтe. Подрoбную инфоpмацию о шинах мoжетe изучить на нaшeм cайтe.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 5 | Views: 191
AVATAR
Chuck
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 1036
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 2:30 pm

Re: Do you own a museum?

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 8:28 pm

Jshuey wrote: Mon Jul 22, 2024 5:27 pm five hand-carved fireplaces
THOSE are friggin' impressive! Now that's a museum when even the building is vintage! Very cool. Love to see more.
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 116
User avatar
58chevy
Posts: 406
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 5:58 pm

Re: Strange aberration

by 58chevy » Mon Jul 22, 2024 8:01 pm

Very enlightening commentary on aberrations/morphotypes/phenotypes, etc. Good food for thought.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 167 | Views: 586521
AVATAR
Chuck
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 1036
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 2:30 pm

Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 6:14 pm

20-21july2024: 80F sunny, no rain
1 observed in Wayne Co, I did not go afield.

22july2024: 84F/29C, sunny.
3 observed: 1F (worn) on Bergamot; 2 fighting a while in forest, primary hilltop. Where are they? I checked the Teasel and Yellow Cup Plant fields, nothing. This low count would jive with with a drop in population in late July that I've observed previous years; we will see.

Also captured a large fresh P cresphontes, the first I've ever seen in NY nectaring (on Bergamot) in a field.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 5 | Views: 191
User avatar
Jshuey
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 169
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2022 2:27 pm

Re: Do you own a museum?

by Jshuey » Mon Jul 22, 2024 5:27 pm

Again – it all sounds familiar. Forget the collection, our living space is full of museum-like stuff (not so much museum quality though!). And our 140-year old house itself has a lot of detailing you won’t find in most places - like parquet floors, five hand-carved fireplaces, bay windows, leaded glass and so on. All in very poor condition when we purchased the place, but since restored!
In keeping with the spirit of the house, for most of the house we buy quality “old stuff” that blends in with the house proper. Our furniture averages perhaps 150 years old – typically with hand-carved detailing. Antique wool rugs from the Middle East. Decent original art ranging from a couple old Dutch oils and a handful of regional impressionistic stuff from the 30’s and 40’s. We used to love traveling to auctions and buying stuff like this, but also because when you buy quality furnishings “second hand” – they retain value.
And just like many museums, we have a hard time de-accessioning stuff. We need a rule that says “something has to go” if you buy something that adds to the craziness.
John
Image
Before – Fireplace sprayed with stucco for some crazy reason.
After - English Oak Griffin, antique African effigy - plus santa uses this fireplace!
Topic: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 2 | Views: 25
User avatar
livingplanet3
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 628
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 4:55 pm

Re: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity

by livingplanet3 » Mon Jul 22, 2024 4:45 pm

Long ago, I heard from a colleague that some adult darkling beetles have been known to live for at least 15 years, but I'm not sure of the origin of this claim, and can't give a reference. Possibly though, it came from long-term studies of tenebrionid species in the Namib Desert, which may have started as far back as the 1960s, at the Gobabeb Research Institute founded by Austrian entomologist Charles Koch (1904–1970).
Topic: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 2 | Views: 25
User avatar
kevinkk
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 369
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 5:06 pm

Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity

by kevinkk » Mon Jul 22, 2024 4:13 pm

On June 21rst of 2022 I picked up this beetle at Lost Lake in Linn county Oregon, the elevation is about 3500 f.
I didn't find a lot about care, so I have had it in a large enclosure with some forest substrate, dry plant material and mist the whole thing from time to time. It's still going, and walks around in the evenings.
I'll look for a biotope picture and try to get that on this as well. It's been a nice pet, very low maintenance, my Great Grig was in the same enclosure
for a time, also found at the same location, but it apparently perished and the ants got to it before I did.
So, this beetle has been doing well, by any means, for over 2 years at this point.
beetle 2024 A.JPG
beetle 2024 A.JPG (118.31 KiB) Viewed 25 times
Lost Lake Biotope.JPG
Lost Lake Biotope.JPG (83.07 KiB) Viewed 22 times
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 116
AVATAR
Chuck
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 1036
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 2:30 pm

Re: Strange aberration

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 11:43 am

Thanks, Vernon. I used to think I had a nice series of Apantesis phalerata until I saw yours.
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 20 | Views: 2940
AVATAR
Chuck
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 1036
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 2:30 pm

Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 11:39 am

vabrou wrote: Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:21 pm billions of mercury vapor and similar lights over two centuries... lights seen from indoors through windows, ... hundreds of thousands of malls and gasoline stations
We know that some moths are not much attracted to MV; cecropia for example is more likely to be found at incandescent and metal halide. But for the most part, Saturnids and Sphingids are more likely to come to MV.

That said, they of course do come to porch lights and windows, including to LED. I suppose with enough local home lights it could reduce the quantity coming to my MV.

Still, with MV being by far the most attracting, our area converted to MH some 30 years ago. This was a pain, as the number of gas stations and such worth checking in the morning dropped and dropped until it hit zero. Now with commercial lighting (eg malls, gas stations, auto dealers) converted or converting to LED, I've not seen an increase in the moths flying around lights at night.

In our area, there has been an increase in both commercial lighting and new homes (LED, mostly) though there's a minimum .75km of thick deciduous forest between my MV and these places.

There may be a correlation between being attracted to lights and where the moths lay eggs. I don't know, but I'd not be surprised. If that were the case, one would think I'd still find promethea and cecropia cocoons in the back yard, but I do not.

If the new MH and LED lights in the area impacted all moths equally, and were the cause of loss at my MV, I'd expect to also see a marked drop in Catocala and Arctids, but I do not, those quantities at my MV are unchanged.

So while I have no doubt that an increase in regional lighting does have some impact on Saturnid populations, I doubt it's in the top three factors for the populations decreases.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 33
User avatar
livingplanet3
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 628
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 4:55 pm

Re: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by livingplanet3 » Sun Jul 21, 2024 10:23 pm

A non-biting midge of the family Chironomidae -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chironomidae
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 20 | Views: 2940
User avatar
adamcotton
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 817
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2022 12:24 pm

Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by adamcotton » Sun Jul 21, 2024 8:17 pm

If that is correct, over the long term moth numbers should gradually recover as light sources are modernised to be less attractive to insects in general.

I suspect that both the introduced parasitoid and light pollution are only two of a myriad of different factors causing decline in population numbers.

Adam.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 33
User avatar
adamcotton
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 817
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2022 12:24 pm

Re: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by adamcotton » Sun Jul 21, 2024 8:11 pm

Welcome to Insectnet.

It looks like a mosquito, probably male, or at least a closely related Dipteran.

I am sure one of our more knowledgeable local US members can give you a much better identification than I can from the other side of the World.

Adam.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 33
AVATAR
PhoenixBugs
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:26 pm

Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by PhoenixBugs » Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:33 pm

Hello! This is my first time on the forum, and I am still relatively new to insect photography/identification (about a half year now). I love the photography- I still primarily shoot birds and other large wildlife, but insects have been a new addition to my passions. However, I am sorely incapable of identification as of yet, so I'm hoping I could get some help on here!
Here is a few angles of some insect that I spotted on a small leafy bush in Ithaca, New York. It is very small (a few millimeters at most). I would love to hear anyone's thoughts on what it is (maybe it's obvious to others, haha)! I would also truly appreciate any good resources for learning how to identify insects in the future :)
Untitled design - 2024-07-21T152012.798.jpg
Untitled design - 2024-07-21T152012.798.jpg (70.77 KiB) Viewed 33 times
Untitled design - 2024-07-21T152034.358.jpg
Untitled design - 2024-07-21T152034.358.jpg (63.77 KiB) Viewed 33 times
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 20 | Views: 2940
User avatar
vabrou
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 11:22 am

Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:21 pm

Chuck, Trehopr1 also is noting a major fly offender, but billions of mercury vapor and similar lights over two centuries are the real blame. The early entomologists documented what happened in Brazil when the electric street lights made their first appearance stating that the moths at the lamps were 7 layers deep. And today it is not just street lights but lights seen from indoors through windows, and covering virtually every structure (facade lighting) in cities and rural areas, farms and woodlands and along hundreds of millions of miles of highways and even on gravel and mud roads. Then the hundreds of thousands of malls and gasoline stations over the past century.
User avatar
vabrou
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 11:22 am

Re: i have an enclosure measuring 4x4x3 inches, what kinda insect would be ideal for this enclosure?

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 6:55 pm

Perfect for a....
Attachments
the-flea-circus--the-master-of-ceremonies-andrea-ribeiro-4137330507.jpg
the-flea-circus--the-master-of-ceremonies-andrea-ribeiro-4137330507.jpg (127.52 KiB) Viewed 18 times
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 116
User avatar
vabrou
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 11:22 am

Re: Strange aberration

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 6:17 pm

Meek...Meek...

We anxiously await to see your aberration. Here usual appearance of male (upper) and female (lower) Abaeis nicippe (Sleepy Orange).
Attachments
DSCF0011btrrep.jpg
DSCF0011btrrep.jpg (547.39 KiB) Viewed 86 times
DSCF0012.JPG
DSCF0012.JPG (447.5 KiB) Viewed 86 times
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 116
User avatar
vabrou
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 11:22 am

Re: Strange aberration

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 5:42 pm

Where exactly does an aberration stop, and do morphotype/phenotype variations begin?? And are there morphotypes/phenotypes of aberrations? And are there aberrations of morphotypes/phenotypes?
Here are some thoughts I thunk, while I was thinking.

Here in a recent (2024) publication I illustrated some adults of a common arctiid species that flies here at my home ~every calendar-day of the year. On page 1a-r males are illustrated.

Question is which example is normal? My answer: NONE.
Better yet which are normal among the tens of thousands I have personally captured in Louisiana? My answer: STILL NONE.
Question is which one is an example of a phenotype? My answer: NONE identified as to which broods it belongs too in this publication.
Better yet which are phenotypes among the tens of thousands I have personally captured in Louisiana? My answer: Phenologically speaking, Some, as there are 4-5 annual broods in Louisiana. And NONE identified as to which broods they belong too.
Question is which one is an example of a morphotype? My answer: All of them.
Better yet which are morphotypes among the tens of thousands I have personally captured in Louisiana? My answer: All of them.
Question is which one is an example of an aberration? My answer: Who knows? There is no world-wide accepted definition of what an aberration of a moth is.

Think about it!!, when you have time to waste.

attached are pages 1,2 and 3.
Attachments
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_1.jpg
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_1.jpg (213.05 KiB) Viewed 87 times
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_2.jpg
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_2.jpg (525.2 KiB) Viewed 87 times
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_3.jpg
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_3.jpg (510.26 KiB) Viewed 87 times
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 116
User avatar
vabrou
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 11:22 am

Re: Strange aberration

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 4:32 pm

Meek...Meek...
Surprisingly, aberrations are not all that rare. The problem I always have is that finding them or spotting them seems difficult. The few I have found were often sitting upon the top of hundreds of thousands of other insects staring at me--- consequently easily discovered. For example this common butterfly has five annual broods in the state of Louisiana, adults occurring from the end of March to the beginning of November each year. I captured an aberrant male of this common eastern US butterfly in one of my live-capture fermenting fruit bait traps here at my home. I sometimes captured a dozen or more Limenitis arthemis astyanax (Fabricus, 1775) daily in fruit-bait traps and high-wattage light traps, amounting to several thousands of adults captured over the past 65 years by me personally. And for five or more decades I papered duplicates for sale or exchange of this abundant butterfly. Returning to my desk with the daily trap captures one day, a particular specimen had a damaged wing so put it aside to later discover I had captured a very unique adult of L. a. astyanax at the Abita Entomological Study Site in a live-capture fermenting fruit bait trap, an actual true 'purple' male of the (common name) 'red-spotted purple', which is never purple. see attached image. Upper male (a) is the usual color of the species throughout eastern North America. Lower male (c) is the real unique actual male purple-colored specimen I captured.
Attachments
comparison of males jpg.jpg
comparison of males jpg.jpg (36.45 KiB) Viewed 91 times
Topic: A parade of Catocala moths | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 64 | Views: 9278
User avatar
vabrou
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 11:22 am

Re: A parade of Catocala moths

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 3:04 pm

Here is another one I described Catocala charlottae Brou, 1988, male & female illustrated here. The species name I chose was charlottae after my wife Charlotte Dozar Brou. The good quality 1988 TYPE series consisted of 100 males and 64 females. This small yellow hindwing species has genitalia similar in appearance and structure to numerous other smaller Catocala species.

Later in 2003 I published a brief one page species account. In that account I remarked "Catocala charlottae also has a very similar resemblance to Catocala praeclara Grt & Rob. except that charlottae lacks the black basal dash found in C. praeclara. Some lepidopterist have questioned it's species status because of the similarity in appearance of charlottae and praeclara. It is possible that charlottae could be a geographically consistent variation of praeclara, perhaps as a result of the 'founder effect', though charlottae occurs eastwardly through the states of Mississippi, Alabama, and into Florida to the Atlantic coastline, also without basal dashes. The forewing color of praeclara can vary over it's considerable eastern USA range from a pastel green sheen to violet tinted in appearance. Here in Louisiana at the TYPE locality, the forewing ground color of charlottae is consistently silver-gray in appearance, never once green or purple, and the basal dash attribute occurs in only 3 adults in a total sample size of n = 1,054 adults (that is statistically insignificant to base a subspecies upon).

The current group of 'experts' have created two subspecies under C. praeclara, one (which is from Canada), the other is C. p. charlottae. But, there is no justification that either of these two subspecies are indeed subspecies of anything. The reason this happened is that the current-day batch of authors don't have a better place to put these two related species names. After-all, taxonomy 'waxes and wane's according to whomever is the current day batch of book authors. I have no doubt, that in the future this subspecies designation will revert back to full species status. Why not, over time most every thing else has?
Attachments
Catocala charlotti male & female.JPG
Catocala charlotti male & female.JPG (122.47 KiB) Viewed 14 times
Topic: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 7 | Views: 261
User avatar
lamprima2
Premium Member - 2024
Premium Member - 2024
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:16 pm

Re: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps?

by lamprima2 » Sat Jul 20, 2024 11:51 pm

Thanks a lot, Adam