Recent posts
Topic: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele | Author: Cabintom | Replies: 23 | Views: 249
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Re: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 9:27 am

Enjoying this travel report very much. Makes me SO want to travel to exotic places again!
Topic: Breeding: Favonius quercus | Author: wolf | Replies: 1 | Views: 9
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Favonius quercus

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 9:18 am

Bred in 2020 from eggs found in the field on the hostplant Quercus petraea. This species is widespread along the coastal areas in southeastern Norway. Its usually easier to look for eggs, than to find the adults.
Lifecycle information: The eggs hibernate. I found the eggs 1st of April, and they hatched on the 22nd of April. The total lifecycle from egg to imago was about 9 weeks.
Larval stages lasted 20-24 days
Pupal stages lasted 17-21 days
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 4/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

L2
Image

L3
Image

L4
Image
Image

Pupa
Image

Imago
Image
Image

A few more high res pictures over HERE
Topic: Breeding: Gonepteryx rhamni | Author: wolf | Replies: 1 | Views: 10
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Gonepteryx rhamni

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 9:01 am

Yet another project from this year. A very common species, flying everywhere, having at least two generations in Norway. I found eggs on the hostplant in the field, the hostplant being Frangula alnus.
Lifecycle information: Total lifecycle from egg to imago was about 5 weeks.
Eggs used 9 days to hatch
Larval stages lasted 14-18 days
Pupal stages lasted 14 days
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 5/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

L2
Image

L3
Image

L4
Image

L5
Image
Image

Pupa
Image

Imago
Image
Image

A few more high res pictures over HERE
Topic: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele | Author: Cabintom | Replies: 23 | Views: 249
User avatar
Cabintom
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2022 1:54 pm

Re: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele

by Cabintom » Sun Oct 02, 2022 8:44 am

Chuck wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 8:55 pm Porters? Bath? Man you’re living the life of luxury! Lemme guess, you have more than two undershorts too.
If you can afford to, I recommend packing at least 3 pairs of undershorts. :) That way you have a back-up pair for when you inevitably drop a fresh pair in the mud while trying to dress balanced on two lengths of wet bamboo.
Topic: Breeding: Thecla betulae | Author: wolf | Replies: 1 | Views: 5
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Thecla betulae

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 8:40 am

New project from this year. Eggs collected from a female last year. This species is localized and scarce along the coast in the southeastern part of Norway. The larva usually feed on Prunus spinosa but also Prunus domestica. I used the latter as my hostplant.
Lifecycle information: The eggs hibernate. I tried to move some eggs inside in the beginning of April, but they did not hatch, regardless of the high indoor temperature. The first eggs hatched 1st of May in synchronization with the first leaf buds on the hostplant sprouting. As a note i ended up with 60 eggs total, but only 25 eggs hatched this year. The unhatched eggs still look ok, so im keeping them until next year to see if they hatch after hibernating twice.
Larval stages lasted 28-30 days
Pupal stages lasted 20-21 days
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 4,5/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

L2
Image

L3
Image

L4
Image
Image

Pupa
Image

Imago
Image

A few more high res pictures over HERE
Topic: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae | Author: wolf | Replies: 4 | Views: 46
User avatar
adamcotton
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 222
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2022 12:24 pm

Re: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae

by adamcotton » Sun Oct 02, 2022 8:34 am

Ah, I understand. The way you originally wrote the text suggested that they start feeding on one plant and then at some stage need to switch to a different host plant species in order to finish the larval stage. Thanks for the clarification.

Adam.
Topic: Breeding: Plebejus orbitulus | Author: wolf | Replies: 1 | Views: 8
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Plebejus orbitulus

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 8:14 am

Bred in 2020/2021. This species is confined to the mountains in southern Norway and flies in one generation. The larva feed on Astragalus alpinus.
Lifecycle information: The larva hibernated as L2
Eggs used 5 days to hatch
The larva molts 4 times, changing to L3 about 7 days after being taken out of hibernation. Larval stages from post hibernation to pupa was 16 days.
Pupal stages lasted 9-10 days
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 2/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

L2
Image

L3
Image

L4
Image
Image

Pupa
Image

Imago
Image
Image
Image

A few more high res pictures over HERE
Topic: Breeding: Glaucopsyche alexis | Author: wolf | Replies: 3 | Views: 40
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Re: Breeding: Glaucopsyche alexis

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 7:43 am

Trehopr1 wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 6:24 pm I was wondering if at the end of each species summary you could give us a "species success" rating based on a 1 to 5 scale; with five being high success and 1 being almost "nil" success.
Such a rating will be very subjective and alot of variables can be taken into account. But i'll try and add a rating based only on % of individuals i got through to imago.
Topic: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae | Author: wolf | Replies: 4 | Views: 46
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Re: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 7:29 am

adamcotton wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 7:07 pm
wolf wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 10:48 am The larva feed on different plants.
Please can you explain a bit more about this. I assume you mean that at a particular instar the larvae move from one species of plant to a different one.

Adam.
Hi Adam. No, i just mean it can use a variety of plants as hostplant(i updated the original post). However it was no problem to switch back and fourth between the two hostplants i used in the middle of the larval stages.
Topic: Breeding: Nymphalis antiopa | Author: wolf | Replies: 3 | Views: 40
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Re: Breeding: Nymphalis antiopa

by wolf » Sun Oct 02, 2022 7:25 am

Trehopr1 wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 6:06 pm Was this species one of the "easiest" to work with and have such good results ?
It was pretty easy to breed them. I've heard its notoriously hard to get the female to lay eggs in captivity though. I've tried it once and she would not lay eggs that time.
Topic: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele | Author: Cabintom | Replies: 23 | Views: 249
AVATAR
Chuck
Posts: 229
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 2:30 pm

Re: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele

by Chuck » Sat Oct 01, 2022 8:55 pm

Porters? Bath? Man you’re living the life of luxury! Lemme guess, you have more than two undershorts too.
Topic: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae | Author: wolf | Replies: 4 | Views: 46
User avatar
adamcotton
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 222
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2022 12:24 pm

Re: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae

by adamcotton » Sat Oct 01, 2022 7:07 pm

wolf wrote: Sat Oct 01, 2022 10:48 am The larva feed on different plants.
Please can you explain a bit more about this. I assume you mean that at a particular instar the larvae move from one species of plant to a different one.

Adam.
Topic: Breeding: Glaucopsyche alexis | Author: wolf | Replies: 3 | Views: 40
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 354
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: Breeding: Glaucopsyche alexis

by Trehopr1 » Sat Oct 01, 2022 6:24 pm

An exceptional species !

I was wondering if at the end of each species summary you could give us a "species success" rating based on a 1 to 5 scale; with five being high success and 1 being almost "nil" success.

That would give a good indication to anyone attempting to perhaps raise any of these the difficulty level in achieving adults.

Here in the US the morning cloak and red admiral are prevalent so they could be raised here unlike some of the others you have shown.
Topic: Breeding: Nymphalis antiopa | Author: wolf | Replies: 3 | Views: 40
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 354
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: Breeding: Nymphalis antiopa

by Trehopr1 » Sat Oct 01, 2022 6:06 pm

A superb turnout of chrysalids ! 🎉

Was this species one of the "easiest" to work with and have such good results ?
Topic: Breeding: Glaucopsyche alexis | Author: wolf | Replies: 3 | Views: 40
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Glaucopsyche alexis

by wolf » Sat Oct 01, 2022 12:37 pm

I bred this species in 2015, 2018 and 2020. The species is locally common in the south east part of Norway. Larva feed on different plants in the Fabaceae family. I've bred it on Lotus corniculatus, Vicia cracca and Lathyrus pratensis. It flies in spring in one generation. The pupa hibernates, sometimes hibernating even two times before hatching.
Lifecycle information:
Eggs used 4-5 days to hatch
Larval stage lasted 22 days, molting 3 times
Pupa used 14-16 days to hatch after being taken out of hibernation.
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 4/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

L2
Image

L3
Image

L4
Image
Image

Pupa
Image

Imago
Image
Image

More high res pictures over HERE
Topic: Breeding: Pyrgus malvae | Author: wolf | Replies: 4 | Views: 46
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Pyrgus malvae

by wolf » Sat Oct 01, 2022 10:48 am

Yet another new project from this year. The larva can use a variety of plants as hostplant. In my case i used Filipendula ulmaria and Fragaria vesca. This species is also widespread in Norway, usually having only one generation. Four of my larva completed the full lifecycle this summer, producing a 2nd generation. The rest hibernates as pupa.
Lifecycle information: Full lifecycle from egg to imago lasted around 10 weeks. I lost track on how many times it molted as i was away for a couple of weeks during the breeding. It was also hard to follow the development as the larva creates a housing of the leaves, living inside.
Eggs used 7 days to hatch
Larval stages lasted 43 days
Pupal stages lasted 22 days
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 4/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

Half grown larva
Image

Full grown larva
Image
Image

Characteristic leaf housing
Image

Pupa
Image

Imago
Image

A few more high res pictures over HERE
Topic: Breeding: Pararge aegeria | Author: wolf | Replies: 1 | Views: 19
User avatar
wolf
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 7:23 am

Breeding: Pararge aegeria

by wolf » Sat Oct 01, 2022 10:18 am

A new breeding project from this year. This is a widespread species in Norway, and it usually has two generations in one summer. The larva feed on different grass species. In my case i used both Brachypodium sylvicatum and Milium effusum.
Lifecycle information: The full lifecycle from egg to imago took around 7 weeks. They molted atleast 3 times, but i lost track as i was away for a couple of weeks during the breeding.
Eggs used 7-8 days to hatch
Larval stages lasted 33-35 days
Pupal stages lasted 9-11 days
Difficulty rating based on % of individuals gotten through to imago(1=hard, 5=easy): 4,5/5

Egg
Image

L1
Image

L2
Image

Half grown larva
Image

Full grown larva
Image
Image

Pupa
Image
Image

Imago
Image
Image

A few more high res pictures over HERE
Topic: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele | Author: Cabintom | Replies: 23 | Views: 249
User avatar
Cabintom
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2022 1:54 pm

Re: To Bima & Back Again: A Journey through the Bush of Bas-Uele

by Cabintom » Sat Oct 01, 2022 8:29 am

DAY 7 - July 11th (Hike to Ezabisi)

After a large breakfast we headed off for Ezabisi, a small Kango village on the bank of the Uele River. Unlike the Zande (the majority tribe) or Barambo, who are primarily agriculturalists and hunters, the Kango are unique in making their livelihoods primarily from fishing. Many of their small villages, which dot the shores of the Uele, are inaccessible except by water, and so are isolated from the rest of the world. To get to Ezabisi we hiked 11km from Disolo, following a practically invisible, winding trail, mostly through pristine primary forest. Without our porters I'm certain we would have lost the way.



Since we had a schedule to keep to and we needed to keep moving, it wasn't ideal for collecting. Even so, I managed to snag some interesting specimens and, more importantly, really captured the interest of my traveling companions.
Once arrived in Ezabisi, began by meeting with the village chief and the elders of our small church congregation. I'll admit that the Charaxes, Papilio, Graphium, Neptis, etc. flying about were quite distracting, but it wasn't an appropriate time for collecting and my colleagues rightfully judged that it would have negatively impacted our work and the relationships we had come to establish. So, the nets had been tucked away into the tent and remained there until our departure the following morning. Our meeting went well and soon we were swapping fishing and hunting stories.

Here the chief (on the left) is describing a design for a wild boar trap:
Image
They're laughing because, when I pulled out my camera, I had jokingly told them I had come to steal their hunting secrets. An important thing to know about culture in this part of the country is that at a baseline people are suspicious or your motives if you are an outsider, and even more so, if you are a foreigner. There's a long history of exploitation at the expense of Congolese and, I think rightfully, people are wary of being taken advantage.

Our meeting drew to close when the mamas approached saying our bath was ready. It being midday, this was a bit of a surprise to me (usually a bath is offered at the end of the day), but one simply can't refuse hospitality, especially after a long hike through the humid rainforest. I was led to a small 3-walled screen in which was placed a practically boiling bucket of milky water and two lengths of bamboo on which I would have to balance so that I wouldn't be standing in the mud. I very quickly rinsed off and still finished feeling more like a sandy boiled lobster than I imagined possible. Well, I guess, it's the thought and consideration that counts.

The village mamas:
Image

As evening began to fall, I was pleasantly surprised that the elders agreed to let me do some fishing! I had brought a couple of fishing poles and tackle with me just in case the opportunity presented itself.

Here's me & one of my young fishing guides:
Image
Image
The Kango use these long, hand-carved, round-bottomed, dug-out canoes, which are notoriously unstable, and yet they all seem as comfortable standing in a canoe as they do standing on land. Incredible!

Image
Image

Unfortunately, I didn't catch anything (though I definitely had a bite), but my time out on the river, in the dug-out canoe, casting my line, and enjoying just how adept the young Kango men are in their boats, is one I won’t soon forget. It was one of those moments when you feel that you are just where you ought to be. It’s hard to convey how “foreign” or “exotic” it is compared to where I grew up in northern Ontario, Canada, and yet I felt at home, like being at camp with the men of the family : drinking coffee while sitting around a fire, talking about the big one that got away, and comparing notes on how to best trap a monkey.

Fishing nets are a common sight in the village:
Image

I ended up giving away about half of my tackle:
Image
I grew up fishing on lakes from motor boats and so I feel I have a good sense of what lures work well... in Ontario. No telling if anything I brought with me would perform in the silty flowing water of the Uele, or attract the local fish species. I asked the guys to keep notes and give me a report the next time I visit. Amusingly, the pastor who received the treble-hook spoon (above) plans on fishing for crocodiles. I had inherited that spoon from my grandfather, who I'm sure would be pleased to know how it's now being re-purposed.
Topic: The Mantids are out in FORCE | Author: bethanyfarah | Replies: 4 | Views: 82
User avatar
lamprima2
Premium Member - 2022
Premium Member - 2022
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:16 pm

Re: The Mantids are out in FORCE

by lamprima2 » Sat Oct 01, 2022 7:12 am

This male landed on the screen on my patio's door about
a week ago, when I was celebrating my birthday.
I seldom see them in my area, so it was a pleasant surprise.
My wife said it was certainly the spirit of my grandfather,
who was inordinately fond of Mantidae
DSC_7711 INet.jpg
DSC_7711 INet.jpg (722.08 KiB) Viewed 29 times
.
Topic: Genus: Colias | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 29 | Views: 503
User avatar
Cabintom
Posts: 132
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2022 1:54 pm

Re: Genus: Colias

by Cabintom » Sat Oct 01, 2022 4:22 am

Colias electo pseudohecate Berger, 1940

(males)
ImageImage

ImageImage

(females)
ImageImage

ImageImage

ImageImage