Euphaedra

Share the gems of your insect collection with the InsectNet community
africaone
Junior Member
Junior Member
Reactions:
Posts: 33
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 9:24 am
Belgium

Re: Euphaedra

Post by africaone »

livingplanet3 wrote: Thu Sep 08, 2022 2:42 pm
africaone wrote: Thu Sep 08, 2022 8:50 am
Cabintom wrote: Thu Sep 08, 2022 3:51 am
That's not preussi, which has a differently shaped sub-apical band & does not have a purple sheen.
Looks much more like E. uganda too me, but of course this genus is a difficult one to ID.

Thomas, the picture is saturated with a red component marked. The purple effect may be not not so strong in fact ?
and preussi is a big group :D
I'd wondered if perhaps that photo had been "enhanced" in some way, or if it was just the lighting or angle, as none of the other images I've seen of preussi have colors quite like this.
at first sight I also thought as Thomas it is uganda but without locality and more quality picture none can be sure. Anyway, uganda is good suggestion more than preussi (in which the subapical is often more straight and complete)
User avatar
livingplanet3
Premium Member - 2022
Premium Member - 2022
Reactions:
Posts: 222
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 4:55 pm
United States of America

Re: Euphaedra

Post by livingplanet3 »

africaone wrote: Thu Sep 08, 2022 2:47 pm at first sight I also thought as Thomas it is uganda but without locality and more quality picture none can be sure. Anyway, uganda is good suggestion more than preussi (in which the subapical is often more straight and complete)
The photo was taken at Mabamba Wetlands, Uganda -

https://www.jungledragon.com/image/4809 ... lands.html
User avatar
livingplanet3
Premium Member - 2022
Premium Member - 2022
Reactions:
Posts: 222
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 4:55 pm
United States of America

Re: Euphaedra

Post by livingplanet3 »

daveuk wrote: Thu Sep 08, 2022 6:52 am
Trehopr1 wrote: Wed Sep 07, 2022 7:00 pm Indeed Dave, several European countries have (at one time or another) left a footprint on African soil. So, naturally some of the very collectors who live there or visit come from those countries still. There is also the fact that the continent has such close proximity to Europe so, airfares cost far less than anywhere else.

Also, it could be said that Europe still has an very active entomological community of dealers, collectors, and enthusiasts in general. That is something sadly lacking here in the US where many old age hobbies have fallen by the wayside by the (younger set) who are more interested in being entertained by their cell phones or sports activities !

I would also add that the huge market in Japan for insects (living or dead) is another big factor in much fine material (be it seldom seen, rare, or unique) going there because of the available wealth.

If we do see any of it make it here it's just the leavings...
Our dealer base here has (largely) dried up with dealers retiring or passing away and as I mentioned overall diminished interest in the hobby.
Sad trehopr that there there seems to be not much uptake in our hobby with many young people. That also seems to be the case here in the U.K. as well as in the U.S.A. It does make me wonder what will happen in time to all the private collections when people just lose interest in them.
We are lucky in the U.K. with entomological fairs that still take place here. Have been lucky enough to pick up quite a bit of African material relatively inexpensively at those over time.
But people get older & eventually leave us as you say so unless more young people do take an interest those fairs & the hobby itself will not go on forever. Feel lucky to have known some wonderful dealers here & around the world either personally or on line over time. They have provided me with specimens beyond my wildest dreams.😊
When was the last time that insect collecting was anything more than a "niche" hobby (at least, from a global perspective)? The mid-20th century, perhaps? Certainly, collecting butterflies was even more popular during the Victorian era.

Before the internet, I didn't know a single other person who shared my interest. Many of those I've met online, have stated the same. Yes, it seems likely that the number of people who collect insects is indeed continuing to dwindle, as apart from a quite small minority, the newer generations simply aren't interested in it, despite the fact that the internet has made many insect specimens far more accessible than was previously the case. The decline in the hobby's popularity is partly due to changing culture, and changing technology. I assume that most of the people who are regular users of this forum are in the 45-65+ year old range.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/22 ... -research/
User avatar
kevinkk
Premium Member - 2022
Premium Member - 2022
Reactions:
Posts: 129
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 5:06 pm
Location: Oregon
United States of America

Re: Euphaedra

Post by kevinkk »

Interest is nearly a "porchlight" topic. I'd agree with everything in the above post. Way back in the early 80's I was featured in the local paper, and
the only bite was a former 4H person who donated their empty cases and supplies to my cause. I've sure never seen another collector in the field,
day or night.
Post Reply

Create an account or sign in to join the discussion

You need to be a member in order to post a reply

Create an account

Not a member? register to join our community
Members can start their own topics & subscribe to topics
It’s free and only takes a minute

Register

Sign in