Papilio eurymedon

Share your notes and experiences in the field
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kevinkk
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Papilio eurymedon

Post by kevinkk »

Our last, or latest collecting trip. Not all we brought home, but I did notice something I'd never noticed before in Papilio eurymedon,
caught at two different locations, one about 4100 ft, the other more like 3000 ft, I'm not as sure about the elevation there.
The smaller one, I caught at the higher location, and the larger one, which caught my eye, was caught by my Mom. I saw right
away the color difference in the larger one, having a yellow tint. I'm not sure if it will show up as well in the picture as it does
in person. I had to look up the species, and apparently it's variable in color, I was hoping for something more interesting.
Linn and Marion counties in Oregon. We also brought back Papilio rutulus, Parnassius clodius, a still unidentified small Speyeria
and either a day flying moth or a skipper- it's going to take going through all my books. A lot of got aways. identified as flying
blurs.
Papilio eurymedon.jpg
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Trehopr1
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Re: Papilio eurymedon

Post by Trehopr1 »

That's a wonderful species Kevin. It is indeed variable in it's coloration. Most often they appear as a cream color (as far as the white goes).

I have a singular specimen myself which a friend collected for me. He was quite lucky in capturing a freshly hatched example; so like your mom's specimen it really shows well.

I know if I could capture the species myself I would have a nice series of it ! ☺️
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kevinkk
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Re: Papilio eurymedon

Post by kevinkk »

Mom caught what could have been the best thing we brought back, we got lucky on the way home and stopped at a roadside pullover next to
a creek that was a natural fly way for Papilios, I saw a sulphur go by, a Limenitis species, unless it was a Nymphalis anitopa.
I did identify one of the mystery moths last night, after flipping through a couple books, Litocala sexsignata, I caught it during the day, and later
when I was spreading it, could see it had a proboscis. Small leps are very pretty a lot of the time, but difficult for me to work with, I have to
get out the 2X readers to see what I'm doing.
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