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Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 22
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livingplanet3
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Re: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by livingplanet3 » Sun Jul 21, 2024 10:23 pm

A non-biting midge of the family Chironomidae -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chironomidae
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 19 | Views: 2915
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Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by adamcotton » Sun Jul 21, 2024 8:17 pm

If that is correct, over the long term moth numbers should gradually recover as light sources are modernised to be less attractive to insects in general.

I suspect that both the introduced parasitoid and light pollution are only two of a myriad of different factors causing decline in population numbers.

Adam.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 22
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Re: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by adamcotton » Sun Jul 21, 2024 8:11 pm

Welcome to Insectnet.

It looks like a mosquito, probably male, or at least a closely related Dipteran.

I am sure one of our more knowledgeable local US members can give you a much better identification than I can from the other side of the World.

Adam.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 22
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Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by PhoenixBugs » Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:33 pm

Hello! This is my first time on the forum, and I am still relatively new to insect photography/identification (about a half year now). I love the photography- I still primarily shoot birds and other large wildlife, but insects have been a new addition to my passions. However, I am sorely incapable of identification as of yet, so I'm hoping I could get some help on here!
Here is a few angles of some insect that I spotted on a small leafy bush in Ithaca, New York. It is very small (a few millimeters at most). I would love to hear anyone's thoughts on what it is (maybe it's obvious to others, haha)! I would also truly appreciate any good resources for learning how to identify insects in the future :)
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Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 19 | Views: 2915
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Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:21 pm

Chuck, Trehopr1 also is noting a major fly offender, but billions of mercury vapor and similar lights over two centuries are the real blame. The early entomologists documented what happened in Brazil when the electric street lights made their first appearance stating that the moths at the lamps were 7 layers deep. And today it is not just street lights but lights seen from indoors through windows, and covering virtually every structure (facade lighting) in cities and rural areas, farms and woodlands and along hundreds of millions of miles of highways and even on gravel and mud roads. Then the hundreds of thousands of malls and gasoline stations over the past century.
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Re: i have an enclosure measuring 4x4x3 inches, what kinda insect would be ideal for this enclosure?

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 6:55 pm

Perfect for a....
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Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 4 | Views: 75
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Re: Strange aberration

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 6:17 pm

Meek...Meek...

We anxiously await to see your aberration. Here usual appearance of male (upper) and female (lower) Abaeis nicippe (Sleepy Orange).
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Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 4 | Views: 75
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Re: Strange aberration

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 5:42 pm

Where exactly does an aberration stop, and do morphotype/phenotype variations begin?? And are there morphotypes/phenotypes of aberrations? And are there aberrations of morphotypes/phenotypes?
Here are some thoughts I thunk, while I was thinking.

Here in a recent (2024) publication I illustrated some adults of a common arctiid species that flies here at my home ~every calendar-day of the year. On page 1a-r males are illustrated.

Question is which example is normal? My answer: NONE.
Better yet which are normal among the tens of thousands I have personally captured in Louisiana? My answer: STILL NONE.
Question is which one is an example of a phenotype? My answer: NONE identified as to which broods it belongs too in this publication.
Better yet which are phenotypes among the tens of thousands I have personally captured in Louisiana? My answer: Phenologically speaking, Some, as there are 4-5 annual broods in Louisiana. And NONE identified as to which broods they belong too.
Question is which one is an example of a morphotype? My answer: All of them.
Better yet which are morphotypes among the tens of thousands I have personally captured in Louisiana? My answer: All of them.
Question is which one is an example of an aberration? My answer: Who knows? There is no world-wide accepted definition of what an aberration of a moth is.

Think about it!!, when you have time to waste.

attached are pages 1,2 and 3.
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2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_1.jpg
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_1.jpg (213.05 KiB) Viewed 46 times
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_2.jpg
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2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_3.jpg
2024. 465. Apantesis phalerata (Harris, 1841) (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) in Louisiana master best 5-10-2024wht_Page_3.jpg (510.26 KiB) Viewed 46 times
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 4 | Views: 75
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Re: Strange aberration

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 4:32 pm

Meek...Meek...
Surprisingly, aberrations are not all that rare. The problem I always have is that finding them or spotting them seems difficult. The few I have found were often sitting upon the top of hundreds of thousands of other insects staring at me--- consequently easily discovered. For example this common butterfly has five annual broods in the state of Louisiana, adults occurring from the end of March to the beginning of November each year. I captured an aberrant male of this common eastern US butterfly in one of my live-capture fermenting fruit bait traps here at my home. I sometimes captured a dozen or more Limenitis arthemis astyanax (Fabricus, 1775) daily in fruit-bait traps and high-wattage light traps, amounting to several thousands of adults captured over the past 65 years by me personally. And for five or more decades I papered duplicates for sale or exchange of this abundant butterfly. Returning to my desk with the daily trap captures one day, a particular specimen had a damaged wing so put it aside to later discover I had captured a very unique adult of L. a. astyanax at the Abita Entomological Study Site in a live-capture fermenting fruit bait trap, an actual true 'purple' male of the (common name) 'red-spotted purple', which is never purple. see attached image. Upper male (a) is the usual color of the species throughout eastern North America. Lower male (c) is the real unique actual male purple-colored specimen I captured.
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comparison of males jpg.jpg
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Topic: A parade of Catocala moths | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 64 | Views: 9259
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Re: A parade of Catocala moths

by vabrou » Sun Jul 21, 2024 3:04 pm

Here is another one I described Catocala charlottae Brou, 1988, male & female illustrated here. The species name I chose was charlottae after my wife Charlotte Dozar Brou. The good quality 1988 TYPE series consisted of 100 males and 64 females. This small yellow hindwing species has genitalia similar in appearance and structure to numerous other smaller Catocala species.

Later in 2003 I published a brief one page species account. In that account I remarked "Catocala charlottae also has a very similar resemblance to Catocala praeclara Grt & Rob. except that charlottae lacks the black basal dash found in C. praeclara. Some lepidopterist have questioned it's species status because of the similarity in appearance of charlottae and praeclara. It is possible that charlottae could be a geographically consistent variation of praeclara, perhaps as a result of the 'founder effect', though charlottae occurs eastwardly through the states of Mississippi, Alabama, and into Florida to the Atlantic coastline, also without basal dashes. The forewing color of praeclara can vary over it's considerable eastern USA range from a pastel green sheen to violet tinted in appearance. Here in Louisiana at the TYPE locality, the forewing ground color of charlottae is consistently silver-gray in appearance, never once green or purple, and the basal dash attribute occurs in only 3 adults in a total sample size of n = 1,054 adults (that is statistically insignificant to base a subspecies upon).

The current group of 'experts' have created two subspecies under C. praeclara, one (which is from Canada), the other is C. p. charlottae. But, there is no justification that either of these two subspecies are indeed subspecies of anything. The reason this happened is that the current-day batch of authors don't have a better place to put these two related species names. After-all, taxonomy 'waxes and wane's according to whomever is the current day batch of book authors. I have no doubt, that in the future this subspecies designation will revert back to full species status. Why not, over time most every thing else has?
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Catocala charlotti male & female.JPG
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Topic: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 7 | Views: 247
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Re: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps?

by lamprima2 » Sat Jul 20, 2024 11:51 pm

Thanks a lot, Adam
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 4 | Views: 75
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Strange aberration

by 58chevy » Sat Jul 20, 2024 7:53 pm

I recently captured a specimen of Abaeis nicippe (Sleepy Orange) near Presidio, TX, close to the Mexican border. It's a common species, so I didn't examine it closely. But when I started spreading it, I noticed it had narrow white stripes running vertically against the orange background of both the forewings and hindwings. I've never heard of such a thing. I tried to think of something it might have rubbed up against to create the pattern but the only thing it made contact with was a glassine envelope. Has anyone else observed this unusual aberration? I'll post a picture after it comes off the spreading board.
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Re: Travelling Africa with a small personal collection

by Annarobertson1947 » Sat Jul 20, 2024 3:44 am

Thanks Paul, i was needing advice from people who have traversed Africa with specimens, American and Australian customs issues aren't relevant in this.
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Re: Travelling Africa with a small personal collection

by Paul K » Sat Jul 20, 2024 12:30 am

If I would have to do it, I’d relax them and papered. They could be easy to transport as a small package safe and easy to go thru customs. Then when you settle in Kenya spread them one more time.
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Re: Travelling Africa with a small personal collection

by Annarobertson1947 » Fri Jul 19, 2024 11:31 pm

Thanks Chuck,
Regrettably i don't have the ability to leave behind, am probably not returning to Australia.
Final destination is Kenya.
Carry on luggage a no go as customs guys I'm aware of them .
Specimens will be transported in 2 postage boxes.
In bubble wrap.
This is my best way.they survived postage companies
so am going this way.
To post to destination is ot a good idea as Kenyan entry is an unknown.
So in luggage is best protection.
Should i declare at entry points or just sail through?
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586478
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Fri Jul 19, 2024 5:25 pm

19july2024: 71F/ 22C cloudy, breezy
1 observed

I didn't go to the field today, too much work for too little payoff on a day like this. Lazy citizen scientist.

Did see one driving through the village, it ran into my vehicle and few off.
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Re: i have an enclosure measuring 4x4x3 inches, what kinda insect would be ideal for this enclosure?

by kevinkk » Fri Jul 19, 2024 3:00 pm

If the measurements are correct, I'd say probably nothing in all honesty. That's a very small environment for an animal. Possibly some small
beetle, or isopod.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 159
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by jhyatt » Fri Jul 19, 2024 1:19 pm

Chuck, Your house sounds a lot like ours. Main difference is that my cultural artifacts are largely neotropical (Peruvian beetle-elytra necklaces, etc) rather than from the Pacific. Big basement filled with cabinets of Cornell drawers, and a total of 18 tall bookcases around the house (need more, they're piling up everywhere). Probably 90% of the books are non-fiction. There's a greenhouse filled with exotic plants (mostly Cattleya orchids) and the prints on the walls are often 19th century orchid book illustrations, or superb butterfly lithographs done by a wonderful artist from Kentucky.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586478
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Fri Jul 19, 2024 12:56 pm

adamcotton wrote: Thu Jul 18, 2024 9:16 pm
Chuck wrote: Thu Jul 18, 2024 6:42 pm one fresh M captured
Is this also MST?

Adam.
Yes Sir, yesterday's male captured is MST. From early July, COI says everything in our area (likely all of Finger Lakes) is MST. That said, I've been unable to determine why there seems to be a decrease in the population in late July, followed by a population explosion in early August. Until there is a more thorough genetic analysis of these Tigers they'll all be lumped under "MST"(I'm not inferring there is another taxon, but it's possible that MST has two back-to-back univoltine flights- other taxa do.)

In most of southern Ontario Canada it's a simple dichotomy- they have canadensis and then MST. Around the Toronto area it gets more complex, with canadensis, MST, and glaucus all within a very small area.

In our area it's really a train wreck. Ranging from the warmer lakeshore near Rochester, east along the lakeshore and wrapping around the end of the lake, and then down to Pennsylvania there's warm shore, cold shore, low-level farmland and mountains...all within two hours from my home.

Within this area is reported canadensis, Spring Form, MST, and glaucus. On glaucus, there are no black form females, and while some specimens have COI as glaucus it's no doubt heavily interbred with canadensis.

Where I live, 70km south of Lake Ontario we have Spring Form. Not canadensis, though the flight periods are the same. 70km due north around Sodus Bay on Lake Ontario I call it Spring Form though they are much smaller and universally paler, and easily confused with canadensis which they are NOT (well, at least not pure canadensis.) I cannot imagine they are anything more than hybrid between Spring Form and canadensis.

Working east 60km along the lakeshore from Sodus Bay and around the end of the lake up to eurytides' Kingston there must be a transition zone from hybrid Spring Form/ canadensis to pure canadensis. I do not know where this is. Fortunately, I just located a private collection from that transition area that may help define it.

We know that 300km due east of my location (Adirondack mountains, not Finger Lakes) canadensis occurs. I don't know if there is a hybrid Spring Form/ canadensis zone somewhere in between, though it would make sense.

Of course, we don't know what Spring Form in Finger Lakes is either. We don't know if it's the same as Spring Form in Virginia. We don't know if Finger Lakes Spring Form is closer to glaucus or canadensis or MST. And, of course, with obvious hybridization it's hard to put things into boxes.

Ecological zones on mountains are relatively easy to comprehend. But we're seeing the same thing around Lake Ontario, which is largely rectangular. With cities at each corner (Toronto NW, Buffalo SW, Kingston NE, Watertown SE) the weather each experiences is markedly different: Toronto v. Buffalo- Toronto is colder in winter than Buffalo, but Buffalo gets snow; Kingston v. Watertown- Kingston gets colder a bit, but Watertown gets tons more snow, is slow to warm in summer, and gets extremely violent summer storms. The north shore (Ontario- Toronto to Kingston) is cooler in winter than the south shore (Buffalo to Watertown) but prevailing NW winds over the lake keeps the south shore much cooler in spring and summer [canadensis emerges in Ontario before Spring Form emerges on the south shore]. Scriber and others have published extensive studies on Tigers and seasonal high/low temperatures in the area, but no mention has been made of snowfall or moderation/ delay of warmer weather in spring.

So the complexities around Lake Ontario are extensive, and south and southeast you throw in low mountains. In the Finger Lakes area these "mountains" have 60km long N-S lakes, the west shore which is moderate but prone to flash flooding, and the east shore which gets hammered by snow in winter and sun baked in summer. So where any particular taxon/ form/ whatever may occur, perhaps islanded, is variable and really undefined.
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Re: Travelling Africa with a small personal collection

by Chuck » Fri Jul 19, 2024 12:07 pm

If these are valued specimens I would leave them behind or forward them to final destination. I assume they are not papered.

Humidity in much of Africa is high; and in aircraft it's low. The specimens will cycle through levels of humidity.

You'd be ill advised to check them as baggage, which means hand carrying. I've done this for flights and it's a real pain dragging along a box. You have to watch who puts what in the overhead bin lest they get crushed, and you may not have room in the overhead bin; with airline seats having tiny pouches these days they probably won't fit, and they won't let you hold a box, particularly a glass-topped box, on your lap. Even hand carried they will be jostled, bumped, etc and at high risk of breakage.

You have at least four Customs entries, and in Africa to boot. God knows who you'll encounter. First you have the actual laws of import into each, which you're probably in violation of. Second, an opportunist Customs agent will take the opportunity to either (1) seize specimens they think they can flip for money or (2) shake you down for a cash payment. Then you'll go through Customs at your final/ return destination- if it's Australia you have paperwork to do and AUS is very strict on wildlife import and paperwork.

Overall it's going to be a hassle, and have a high risk of loss and/or damage. I'd not do it.