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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Fri Jul 19, 2024 5:25 pm

19july2024: 71F/ 22C cloudy, breezy
1 observed

I didn't go to the field today, too much work for too little payoff on a day like this. Lazy citizen scientist.

Did see one driving through the village, it ran into my vehicle and few off.
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Re: i have an enclosure measuring 4x4x3 inches, what kinda insect would be ideal for this enclosure?

by kevinkk » Fri Jul 19, 2024 3:00 pm

If the measurements are correct, I'd say probably nothing in all honesty. That's a very small environment for an animal. Possibly some small
beetle, or isopod.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 103
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by jhyatt » Fri Jul 19, 2024 1:19 pm

Chuck, Your house sounds a lot like ours. Main difference is that my cultural artifacts are largely neotropical (Peruvian beetle-elytra necklaces, etc) rather than from the Pacific. Big basement filled with cabinets of Cornell drawers, and a total of 18 tall bookcases around the house (need more, they're piling up everywhere). Probably 90% of the books are non-fiction. There's a greenhouse filled with exotic plants (mostly Cattleya orchids) and the prints on the walls are often 19th century orchid book illustrations, or superb butterfly lithographs done by a wonderful artist from Kentucky.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Fri Jul 19, 2024 12:56 pm

adamcotton wrote: Thu Jul 18, 2024 9:16 pm
Chuck wrote: Thu Jul 18, 2024 6:42 pm one fresh M captured
Is this also MST?

Adam.
Yes Sir, yesterday's male captured is MST. From early July, COI says everything in our area (likely all of Finger Lakes) is MST. That said, I've been unable to determine why there seems to be a decrease in the population in late July, followed by a population explosion in early August. Until there is a more thorough genetic analysis of these Tigers they'll all be lumped under "MST"(I'm not inferring there is another taxon, but it's possible that MST has two back-to-back univoltine flights- other taxa do.)

In most of southern Ontario Canada it's a simple dichotomy- they have canadensis and then MST. Around the Toronto area it gets more complex, with canadensis, MST, and glaucus all within a very small area.

In our area it's really a train wreck. Ranging from the warmer lakeshore near Rochester, east along the lakeshore and wrapping around the end of the lake, and then down to Pennsylvania there's warm shore, cold shore, low-level farmland and mountains...all within two hours from my home.

Within this area is reported canadensis, Spring Form, MST, and glaucus. On glaucus, there are no black form females, and while some specimens have COI as glaucus it's no doubt heavily interbred with canadensis.

Where I live, 70km south of Lake Ontario we have Spring Form. Not canadensis, though the flight periods are the same. 70km due north around Sodus Bay on Lake Ontario I call it Spring Form though they are much smaller and universally paler, and easily confused with canadensis which they are NOT (well, at least not pure canadensis.) I cannot imagine they are anything more than hybrid between Spring Form and canadensis.

Working east 60km along the lakeshore from Sodus Bay and around the end of the lake up to eurytides' Kingston there must be a transition zone from hybrid Spring Form/ canadensis to pure canadensis. I do not know where this is. Fortunately, I just located a private collection from that transition area that may help define it.

We know that 300km due east of my location (Adirondack mountains, not Finger Lakes) canadensis occurs. I don't know if there is a hybrid Spring Form/ canadensis zone somewhere in between, though it would make sense.

Of course, we don't know what Spring Form in Finger Lakes is either. We don't know if it's the same as Spring Form in Virginia. We don't know if Finger Lakes Spring Form is closer to glaucus or canadensis or MST. And, of course, with obvious hybridization it's hard to put things into boxes.

Ecological zones on mountains are relatively easy to comprehend. But we're seeing the same thing around Lake Ontario, which is largely rectangular. With cities at each corner (Toronto NW, Buffalo SW, Kingston NE, Watertown SE) the weather each experiences is markedly different: Toronto v. Buffalo- Toronto is colder in winter than Buffalo, but Buffalo gets snow; Kingston v. Watertown- Kingston gets colder a bit, but Watertown gets tons more snow, is slow to warm in summer, and gets extremely violent summer storms. The north shore (Ontario- Toronto to Kingston) is cooler in winter than the south shore (Buffalo to Watertown) but prevailing NW winds over the lake keeps the south shore much cooler in spring and summer [canadensis emerges in Ontario before Spring Form emerges on the south shore]. Scriber and others have published extensive studies on Tigers and seasonal high/low temperatures in the area, but no mention has been made of snowfall or moderation/ delay of warmer weather in spring.

So the complexities around Lake Ontario are extensive, and south and southeast you throw in low mountains. In the Finger Lakes area these "mountains" have 60km long N-S lakes, the west shore which is moderate but prone to flash flooding, and the east shore which gets hammered by snow in winter and sun baked in summer. So where any particular taxon/ form/ whatever may occur, perhaps islanded, is variable and really undefined.
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Re: Travelling Africa with a small personal collection

by Chuck » Fri Jul 19, 2024 12:07 pm

If these are valued specimens I would leave them behind or forward them to final destination. I assume they are not papered.

Humidity in much of Africa is high; and in aircraft it's low. The specimens will cycle through levels of humidity.

You'd be ill advised to check them as baggage, which means hand carrying. I've done this for flights and it's a real pain dragging along a box. You have to watch who puts what in the overhead bin lest they get crushed, and you may not have room in the overhead bin; with airline seats having tiny pouches these days they probably won't fit, and they won't let you hold a box, particularly a glass-topped box, on your lap. Even hand carried they will be jostled, bumped, etc and at high risk of breakage.

You have at least four Customs entries, and in Africa to boot. God knows who you'll encounter. First you have the actual laws of import into each, which you're probably in violation of. Second, an opportunist Customs agent will take the opportunity to either (1) seize specimens they think they can flip for money or (2) shake you down for a cash payment. Then you'll go through Customs at your final/ return destination- if it's Australia you have paperwork to do and AUS is very strict on wildlife import and paperwork.

Overall it's going to be a hassle, and have a high risk of loss and/or damage. I'd not do it.
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Travelling Africa with a small personal collection

by Annarobertson1947 » Fri Jul 19, 2024 9:35 am

Hi, well im pre empting a problem,
Im heading out of Australia early next year, having relinquished my rental i have to by necessity carry with me a very small collection of my Agrias, 12 specimens .
I will be entering Sth Africa ,Zambia and Kenya, am i going to encounter customs issues ?
Anyone as a collector who travels Africa will have a good idea on this,
Thanks.
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i have an enclosure measuring 4x4x3 inches, what kinda insect would be ideal for this enclosure?

by slamham » Fri Jul 19, 2024 2:45 am

i would prefer to keep something in here that doesnt require a ton of maintinence. any suggestions are appreciated!
Topic: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 6 | Views: 190
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Re: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps?

by adamcotton » Thu Jul 18, 2024 9:21 pm

There is a map in the publication available here:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303313082

Adam.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by adamcotton » Thu Jul 18, 2024 9:16 pm

Chuck wrote: Thu Jul 18, 2024 6:42 pm one fresh M captured
Is this also MST?

Adam.
Topic: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 6 | Views: 190
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Re: Indomalyan Saturniidae distribution maps?

by lamprima2 » Thu Jul 18, 2024 6:58 pm

Thank you both!
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Thu Jul 18, 2024 6:42 pm

16july2024: storms all day. Lucky for us the tornados hit Rome NY instead of us again.

17july2024: all day rain.

18july2024. 73F/22C, mostly cloudy, breezy
4 observed, one fresh M captured. missed a fresh F. The F and other 2 observed stayed in the trees. This was my primary study hilltop, which did get the downpours and wind, but not the hail. No apparent damage to hilltop plants. P troilus more common, Speyeria common.

Checked a couple other fields w/ the yellow cup plant, still only 10% bloom. Fields with Teasel as well. Nothing.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 103
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by kevinkk » Wed Jul 17, 2024 9:55 pm

Super post. Well written and well rounded.
My museum is more like all my rooms over the years rolled into one. toys, books and bugs. I like things original, but I can't swing that
original Creature from the Black Lagoon poster, but my Hammer movie posters are real. Besides the science books, there's the fiction.

Arkham house, Lovecraft and his buddies. The Kindle has everything. but there's nothing like holding an 80 year old hardcover by Robert E. Howard.
A little while ago, I stopped adding to my museum because of depressing health issues, but, I realized that I'm not dead yet, so there are
recent additions, and I'm working on more.

The need to know. At school I was teased for being smart, well, ok, call me Mr. Spock. So, how's being a twit working out for you? I collect anything interesting ,and there's a lot of interesting things. My saltwater fish, although they are getting to be love/hate, if that clown fish would quit biting me, it'd be nice. Old things are wonderful, I have all the old family photos I could lay my hands on, not everyone appreciates these pictures, I have them scanned, and the hard copies as well, without history, we don't know where we came from. I see guys riding logs down a river, and stacking hay.
The rule of collecting and saving stuff- like what you buy and buy what you like.

Build bigger rooms, with more wall space. mine are covered in shelving, posters, and one of my favorites, of which you cannot have an original-
the prehistoric cave painting prints, which are really amazing.
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Re: Collecting moths in places not near home - how to bring equipment?

by vabrou » Wed Jul 17, 2024 9:51 pm

Collecting moths in places not near home - how to bring equipment?

For me I use a small cargo container (highway compliant), spare tires for cargo container and vehicle (pick-up truck or van. And I bring 6 light traps and associated collection chambers, also spare lamps and tubes. I collect clearwing moths so I usually bring anywhere up to 100+ lure traps with bucketful of granular NaCn, and quart of ethyl acetate. I have two 6,000 watt gasoline powered electrical generators and bring at least one sometimes two. I bring 50+ gallons of gasoline in case I stay several days/nights. Two weed whackers, I even bring a portable electric refrigerator or freezer, lots of water, and food, and if you have a small habatchi I have even had steaks, sausages, etc. I'll even bring frozen daiquiris for those unbearable 90-100 degree F days and nights. Bring lots of ice for 3 or more days. Gallons of water to wash hands, feet etc. I often have (4) 20" electrical box fans, or I also have used a small window size electrical air-conditioner to use in the tent. In winter time collecting I bring one or two 1800-Watt Electric Oil-Filled Radiator Space Heaters for overnight in tent. I bring extra pants and shirts socks and shoes, an inflatable bed or cot, pillow, blankets, paper towels, cloth rags and towels, etc., several folding chairs and folding work-table, wind up alarm clock. I bring writing utensils, tons of paper envelopes (I never use glassine envelopes). I bring dozens of foam bottom pinning containers for captured specimens. (5-10) chlorocresol charged relaxing containers for those specimens to return home with in fresh condition like capture hours ago even though they were actually captured 3-4 days ago. Don't forget 5,000+ insect pins, several tweezers, hypodermic syringes, pint of 70% isopropyl alcohol, multiple cameras, tool box with a lot of tools. Most importantly, I always bring a battery-powered radio, cell phone, knives, machete, a gun, holster and ammo for personal protection from wild hogs, bears, and those occasional two-legged pest. 500 feet of top quality extension cords, 10-3, 12-3, 14-3, 16-3 gauge sizes. Mosquito repellent, band-aids, bandages, calamine lotion, triple antibiotic ointment, meds for usual medical problems you may have for several days beyond your planned trip days, diabetes, etc., burns, eye injuries, injuries due to toxic plants, insects, snakes, etc., cell phone. Did I mention guns and ammo, if you can't remember, just bring more guns and ammo, one can never have enough guns and ammo? NOW YOU KNOW WHY I NEED A CARGO CONTAINER. Oh, I occasionally bring fishing rods and tackle, for those opportunistic times.
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Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 103
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Do you own a museum?

by Chuck » Wed Jul 17, 2024 7:55 pm

Is your home a museum?

From my very youth, I loved museums and libraries. Everything was there to look at in real life, in detail. Everything was at your fingertips in 3D. Museums are of course educational displays of niches of the world, but they are also collections.

I'll not wax on about what psychologists say about collectors, their needs, the drivers, their insecurities. To me, a collection is a museum, right at home. A library BTW is a collection of books yet I rarely see the shrinks say much about peoples' libraries.

The problem with museums and libraries is that to the experience they are mundane and boring. They are limited to what they display. Not to say the displays aren't cool- look at the insect displays at AMNH and Carnegie. But they don't have everything. And, you can't touch them.

My parents called me "Dr. Why" because I always asked "why." I want to know it all. I must know. I must do it. How do you time the chain after replacing the cylinder head? What does make the AK47 so special, and why do people still actually believe Kalashnikov designed it? Why does our Tiger Swallowtail look different than the rest? What do you mean there were significant economic factors that would induce New England to embrace war with the southern states? What type of bird is that in the headdress? Why do people from Norway look different from the Indonesians? What do you mean Norwegian language is related to Hungarian, how can that be? When did they stop making US coins with silver? Is Stanleyville any better off now?

And so, my home has become a museum and library. And, even better, there's no stupid Starry Night reprints, no junk machine made carpets, it's all cool artwork- bokhara carpets, papyrus paintings, real insects, Fiji warclubs, precolombian masks, antique Hmong hill tribe outfits, Meow tribe silver jewelry, Original US Army photos used for small arms training manuals, Tongan Tapa mats, my god what else, etc.

The library of course delves into incredible details you won't find in public libraries- long forgotten explorers, now forgotten battles of WW2, global history, nature, you name it. Plus of course the antique books.

My wife will tell you I never got rid of anything. This is true; I have my grade school artwork, 50 YO Aurora dinosaur models, cap guns, bb guns, a piece of USS Constitution, you name it, I got it. Except stamps- those I laminated and use for bookmarks. Coins? I search every handful I get and pull out silver and wheat pennies which go in the jug of silver dollars and Kennedy halves. I have type specimens, and in other fields I have the earliest, I have the only one known to still exist.

Oh no! A psychologically challenged collector! Perhaps, but I do part with stuff. When the missus asked how we were going to pay for a new boat I said "I'll sell this item I've had" and done. When she needed a new vehicle I said "oh I just some some of this old stuff, let's pay cash." My museum has never crashed and lost as much as my 401k. And some of this old junk is now stupid money. My god, I wish my dad let me buy that 1969 Shelby Cobra GT500 for $7500. I'd be retired today.

I do not like boring homes with repop artwork prints and cheap fake flowers. I like MUSEUM HOMES! And garages. The focus may not be my thing, so it's fun to explore, ask questions, handle, and learn. YES I DO want to see your Buprestids! One buddy has hundreds of those old planes, he can recreate any crown molding dating back to the early 1800s. Another has motorcyles behind a velvet rope- in the living room. Another who recently passed had every machine gun known to man. The brother restore 1930s vintage racing sailboats (they have some cash.) Another couple has their own maritime museum focusing on local history. I LOVE museums. I suppose since they're not MY collection they don't count for the shrink analysis.

I am in the process of downsizing. Aside from artwork-type stuff that could be considered standard fare for a normal house, at one time the stuff was under every bed, filled every closet, and packed the basement. It's not like you had to navigate through piles of stuff to get around the house. Not that I have a problem with that- the best private museum ever was the Sargon Museum of Natural History (my coin, it didn't actually have a name, just an apartment number.) And this place was floor to ceiling packed with butterflies you've never seen, cultural artifacts, antiquities, fossils, you name it...and not the stuff you could get with money, it was the stuff you could only get with the best connections. Despite what some would call "cluttered" you didn't actually have to move, you could sit on the sofa and just look at stuff. Or, pick up the mammoth ivory arm band, or the Viking spearhead sitting on the coffee table next to a 2' tall stack of books. It was joy.

Some interests go, but the collection doesn't. When I was a teen we'd go to the bank, buy $50 in silver dollars, and sort out the real silver coins. I haven't done that in 45 years but I still have those coins; haven't seen them in three years though. I know I have some old black power cannons- actually shoot- from museum gift shops back in the day. LOL. Not any more! Wait, you want to eat dinner with Cutco knives? Not in this house. I'll admit to having parted with the 1960s Hoover vacuum...technology put it to shame. I do have every single cell phone I've ever had, functional, including the Motorola Brick; this isn't collecting, I may need one some day. It's about time to rotate the 7' hand painting of Angkor Wat for something else.

Why spend money on a new Honda Civic when you can buy used the first year 2009 Acura TLS SHAWD with 307 naturally aspirated HP for less? So every time you need a car, you don't buy a cheap new one, you buy a cheap classic. I'll admit though, without a storage barn the autos became a chore and I did part with most of them. Like everything, if you take care of it it will last a long time, and if you keep them all next thing you know, you have a collection. Uh oh. It creeps up on you.

The library. I always loved those old British manor estates, passed down through generations, because they have a five tier library. Now we're talking. Why toss old books, your great-great-great-grandson might want to read it. So while my library wasn't even three tiers, it was pretty extensive. Wife said I can't keep it all when we move. I was aghast. But there were books I'd never read again, despite being great books, and nobody else seems to want to read them. Heck, nobody in my family has read the books I've written, I just can't understand, doesn't everyone love reference books? So the books have been going to new homes- most, not ironically, other collectors. I've dumped virtually all of my old SciFi, though did pull out Canticle for Leibowitz to read one last time.

So incidentally, almost accidentally, in-depth interests and time have conspired to build me a fabulous museum. You know, I like it.

What's your museum look like?
Topic: New core website insectnet.com | Author: wollastoni | Replies: 1 | Views: 38
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New core website insectnet.com

by wollastoni » Wed Jul 17, 2024 7:27 pm

With a view to continuous improvement, I have financed a modern, 10x faster version of the insectnet.com core site.
This will make the site easier to visit, should please Google and therefore attract even more people to InsectNet. The site will also be quicker to update.

There is some fine-tuning to do to improve the look & feel, but this will be done in the coming weeks.

It may also solve the Server Issue we had in the recent past on the forum. (I haven't seen the error 500 for many weeks now).
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Wed Jul 17, 2024 6:41 pm

eurytides wrote: Wed Jul 17, 2024 4:36 pm I hope there aren’t any more bumps in the road. Also, I hope your brand new deck wasn’t damaged!
The irony, and I do have to laugh while crying, is that the storm created a new drainage path which is right into the basement window...which is under the deck which took me 4 weeks to restore and is only 18" high at the house, so some of the decking has to come up.

There are always bumps in the road. "I can't wait until..."

I get a part time job, then I won't be poor anymore
I can drive, so I'll have freedom
I graduate college and can make big money
I can buy a house of my own and be my own king
The kids are out of the house and we're free
Mom and Dad don't need the care as they age
I can retire and be free

All along the road of life there are bumps. We often look for that great ray of sunlight right around the corner, when life is easy. Yet somehow, the sun comes, then the storms, and we never really have it easy. There may be a perfect day, maybe even a perfect week, but there is no perfect year.

The optimist waits eagerly to overcome that "final" hurdle.

The pessimist knows there's always another train around the bend.

The realist realizes today isn't so bad, and you don't get it back; don't wait for the easy life to enjoy life.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by eurytides » Wed Jul 17, 2024 4:36 pm

I hear you on the lack of time issue Chuck. Take care of your home and family. I hope there aren’t any more bumps in the road. Also, I hope your brand new deck wasn’t damaged!
Topic: A parade of Catocala moths | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 63 | Views: 9154
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Re: A parade of Catocala moths

by Chuck » Wed Jul 17, 2024 3:31 pm

I proposed to name a species "tennentisapennis" but it didn't even make it to the elitist New Englanders, I was threatened with death.

I wonder if "berniewasaloonis" would have gone over better.

I also proposed "xiwangrex" in honor of a Canadian colleague researcher, but that got nixed.

Hmmm..."gypsymothus" would be a good try. Catocala gypsymothus.

Nobody has a sense of humor anymore.
Topic: A parade of Catocala moths | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 63 | Views: 9154
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Re: A parade of Catocala moths

by vabrou » Wed Jul 17, 2024 3:04 pm

Chuck,
Reminds me when in 2003 I submitted a manuscript, a generic revision of the moth genus Baileya, which included describing two new species of moths. One of those proposed names was Baileya coonassi. That name was chosen because the new species was most common in an area across southern Louisiana in which the human population of Canadian acadians emigrated to and settled long ago in Louisiana. That local population proudly refer to themselves as coonasses, but not any coonass, but Registered Coon Asses These RCAs can be found working throughout the oil, gas, heavy construction, fishng industry and numerous areas of the workforce. You may find this attached emblem and similar ones on hardhats, tool boxes and vehicle bumpers, etc. These peoples are proud to be known and referred to as RCAs.

But alas, the ignorant elitist good old boy network from the New England area not knowing any better assumed it was a derogatory term and rejected it. So I changed it to the Baileya acadiana Brou, which still referred to the same population of humans. The other new species name I proposed was Baileya ellessyoo Brou. That name was derived from a rhyme of the acronym of my Alma Mater, Louisiana State University Medical Center, the acronym (LSU).

That 2003 freely accessible generic revision (pdf) is available at this link: https://www.academia.edu/20406808/TWO_N ... TATES?sm=b

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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 166 | Views: 586077
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Wed Jul 17, 2024 2:57 pm

eurytides wrote: Wed Jul 17, 2024 2:53 pm When you have a bit more time on your hands, perhaps you could share some pics?
Time I am rather short of. I am so far behind in everything I want to do. You may be retired by the time I get to it. I just dumped another couple hundred papered specimens, some of which dated to the 1970s because I know I'll never get to them.