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Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by wollastoni » Sat Jun 22, 2024 9:02 am

In France, we have the entomology auctions (about 4 sales per year) where important old collections are sold drawers by drawers in auctions. Everyone is happy : collectors (including Museums) get the species they study without having to buy the whole collection, seller (or his family) get a lot of money, the specimens remain curated by passionated entomologists.
You should try to organize that in the US too.

Big museums accept only very few collections and small museums are not a good place to place your beloved collection.
Topic: Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs... | Author: gry | Replies: 2 | Views: 8
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Re: Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs...

by livingplanet3 » Sat Jun 22, 2024 4:29 am

gry wrote: Sat Jun 22, 2024 2:13 am This thing was very small, only about a centimeter across. I thought it was a spider, but I only see six legs. Spotted today in Green Bay, WI.
Definitely a spider, but missing two legs. It looks somewhat like it might be in the genus Philodromus, but that's really just a guess -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/485640/bgimage
Topic: Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs... | Author: gry | Replies: 2 | Views: 8
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Spiderlike thing, but I only see six legs...

by gry » Sat Jun 22, 2024 2:13 am

This thing was very small, only about a centimeter across. I thought it was a spider, but I only see six legs. Spotted today in Green Bay, WI.
DSCN7377.JPG
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Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by vabrou » Fri Jun 21, 2024 11:52 pm

alandmore, actually I began talks with (LSAM) Louisiana State Arthropod Museum concerning the the placement of our master collection around a half century ago. And I have had continuing discussions with the past three museum directors and several curators over these decades. But, I have made over 16 annual sizeable donations there (LSAM) going back to 1971, which already currently amounts to about a 1/4 million top quality Louisiana insect specimens. Our greatest numbers of donated insects insects in the USA amounted to more than 124,301 specimens to the (FSCA, from 1971-2015) The Florida State Collection of Arthropods, Gainesville ,Fla. I say more than because we have lost our official donations records for 17 annual donations over the past 55 years due to a fire, a flood, and several hurricanes. We have used our USA donations as part of our state and Federal tax write-offs since 1971, and this is why we had these donations independently appraised. Donations made to museums out of the US are not usable for tax write offs purposes, so appraisals for worldwide donations were unnecessary and served no legitimate purpose. We made 56 individual donations of insects specimens over the past 55 years just here in the US. And you may ask, have we ever been audited by the IRS. The answer is yes, and the results of that one audit resulted in a further refund to us of over $800.00 USD. Seems I was overly cautious and shorted myself in my calculations and documentation. I was worried before the audit, but was surprised post audit at the final results. Worried, because we always filed our own annual taxes for many decades and without any training, and mistakes can happen anywhere in this process. Things to remember if you are ever audited by the IRS, 1. You are not required to personally make an appearance, but you can hire someone to represent you at the audit. And that is exactly what we did, we hired an accountant for $200.00 to represent us, a retired IRS employee. She made two 100 mile round trips to the IRS office for us, and we created an eight-page document explaining our near half century of entomological research, subsequent hundreds of scientific publications based upon these biological materials, and the related annual donations and appraisals. When the audit was over we paid our $200.00 fee to our representative, and pocketed $600.00 we weren't expecting before the audit. And we never personally made an appearance to the IRS. The importance of not showing up is so that when questions are asked during the audit, your representative can respond with the words 'I don't know'. You on the other hand have to answer all questions if you appear in person at the audit. I have never heard of anyone coming out of an audit by receiving more money. Key words, document, document, document, and plan, plan and plan. My wife and I are both 75 and we can no longer collect and operate our traps and equipment as we have done for the past 55 years. As for all the traps, equipment etc, we have been selling some, giving away some to fellow collectors now for the past three years. And so far we are holding on to our master research collection as we still have 600+ manuscripts in various states of completion. We are always submitting dozens of manuscripts for publication yearly. I have some rather large manuscripts I have been working on, some in process for over several decades. Hopefully I can remain with the living to submit some of them.

Chuck, currently (right now) the McGuire Center in Fla. has no room for any more insects. Though, that matter is always negotiable depending upon the details of who, what, where, when and how. The last place you would want to place your biological materials at, is in the states of New York and California, and placing them in a smaller museum, you may want to save yourself a lot of trouble and unrecouped expense by just setting them ablaze now. What ever assurances you get now from a museum are meaningless; just look at what the communist have done to our entire country in just a few years. Here today, gone tomorrow. Look at the burning of Brazilian museums that have been repositories for tens of thousands of irreplaceable TYPES for centuries, all totally gone because of incompetency by the museum's management. And likewise in Europe in World-wars I and II, entire museums and their centuries of irreplaceable contents bombed to ashes in many countries. Museum workers die, retire, loose interest, and funding is never secure for the future care of your priceless materials. For these reasons we have all along published our findings in print with back-up data and with a selection of images so the future researchers can have an understanding of what were actually reporting upon. Websites are temporary and fluid, always changing and non-permanent, --ALL OF THEM. Websites come and websites go, as the first instance of annual hosting fees not being paid, those websites magically disappear overnight. Text without representative images is almost worthless. Remember 'one photo is worth a thousand words'.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by alandmor » Fri Jun 21, 2024 11:11 pm

I have been pondering some of these same issues as well lately. In addition to finding a suitable location to donate a collection, it’s also imperative that your spouse, family, or other heirs know your wishes in case something should happen to you unexpectedly. Too many collections have become orphaned and neglected when the owner passes away and family members have no idea what to do with it. Towards that end, we recently updated our living trust to include a section that my collection, references, textbooks, microscopes, miscellaneous supplies etc., be donated to the M.C. James Entomological Collection at Washington State University where I received an MS in Entomology. It includes names and contact information of current museum staff. I recently stopped by WSU on a road trip and met with the curator and director of the museum to discuss a future major collection donation and brought some miscellaneous specimens to donate. It’s also not uncommon these days for an institution to ask for a financial donation as well to help cover the cost of curating, housing, and maintaining any donated specimens. My hope is that it will be a while yet before I decide that I no longer can or have the desire to maintain it myself, but if I am run over by the proverbial bus tomorrow, at least there is a place for it to go and people to contact should the unexpected happen.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by Chuck » Fri Jun 21, 2024 5:18 pm

58chevy wrote: Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:01 pm My collection is not large enough (less than 100 drawers) or specific enough (no specialty species in large numbers) to be of interest to a major institution.
Have you asked? As I'd mentioned, museums in, for example, Florida or NY may have interest in your material. Smithsonian I hear wants more specimens.
Topic: What has changed recently with importing? | Author: daffodildeb | Replies: 14 | Views: 3806
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Re: What has changed recently with importing?

by Chuck » Fri Jun 21, 2024 5:16 pm

^^ Vernon, you are absolutely right.

BUT you can beat the rap but not the ride. That's part of the game. That SCOTUS ruling has the potential straighten out government- but it will not happen voluntarily. And the plaintiff in that case was bankrolled for millions of dollars.

If USFWS elects to seize $1000 of anything, sure you can fight it, and all the way to SCOTUS. Do you have the money? A lawyer is going to want over $1000 just to start with...so at that point you're even and beyond it you're losing money.

Government plays this game all the time. The other part of the game is called "seized for evidence" which means they take the laptop you need, your insect collection, your phone that you need to call a lawyer, etc. And in five years you MIGHT get that stuff back.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by alandmor » Fri Jun 21, 2024 4:56 pm

vabrou wrote: Thu Jun 20, 2024 11:39 pm We have all along been pursued by museums far and near. At this point, we are tired.

Vernon, if I may ask, what plans do you have for such an extensive and valuable collection and all the equipment and supplies you've accumulated over the years once you're no longer able to or interested in maintaining it all?
Topic: What has changed recently with importing? | Author: daffodildeb | Replies: 14 | Views: 3806
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Re: What has changed recently with importing?

by vabrou » Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:03 pm

[size=150]daffodildeb, apparently you haven't searched this subject in this forum nor many other worldwide such forums. Here is a recent link in insectnet forum, read it, you may learn something: Bottom line = unless you are engaged in a full time commercial official business of selling insects, YOU DON"T NEED ANY PERMITS WHATSOEVER TO SEND OR RECEIVE INSECTS in or out of the USA, nor have you ever been required to do so.............. Occasional insect sales by hobbyist is not an official business. I have shipped and received far more than 700,000 insects in/out of the USA over the past 60 years. If you have been paying attention the recent US Supreme court decision which has just unanimously outlawed the decades of attempts by the acronym agency 'ATF' attempting to outlaw gun ownership by US citizens. link I mentioned - viewtopic.php?t=1564&sid=74f0e9c261a6bf ... eadbbcc886 This means that all of the ever expanding acronym U.S. government agencies, e.g. FBI, CIA, IRS, FWS, USDA, ATF, US Postal Service, US Forest Service, on and on and on, do not have any authority to make any such laws or regulations upon the citizens of the U.S. There will soon be many more US Supreme court decisions specifically individually addressing each and all of these similar acronym bureaucracies in the US government based upon the very same arguments just handed down unanimously by the US Supreme court. Bottom line, only the US Congress has the authority to make and enforce any and all such regulations and laws upon citizens of the USA, and so far they have not. If you believe otherwise you have been an uninformed victim of elitist anecdotal BS, or are uneducated regarding the 'hows and whys' of our governing constitution, and/or not paying attention to current events. These all-encompassing 'copy and past' regulations across 200 countries of the world are all just a tiny part of a worldwide corrupt attempt to create a ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT which began over 40 years ago, the goal of which is to control everyone and everything on earth. WAKE UP!!! Want to know what happens when governments fall victim to communist and socialist governments, just look at all those countries existing today worldwide? In the US there are currently nearly three million federal employees, but add to that the numbers of state government workers for 50 states, 3,143 county and parish government agency workers, plus an additional 100 county-equivalents in U.S. territories, and unauthorized local self-appointed agencies and governing boards, then the numbers are mind-boggling. Remember what I have said publicly in past decades: NEVER, EVER CALL, SPEAK TO, OR ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR PERSONAL BUSINESS ACTIVITIES, OR RARE SPECIMENS YOU HAVE DISCOVERED, or specific data to locate such rarities WITH ANY GOVERNMENT OR UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEE FOR ANY REASONS WHATSOEVER. TO DO SO WILL RESULT IN YOUR EVENTUAL DEMISE, and/or financial penalties for you. Beyond making these suggestions, I can't fix STUPID. GOOD LUCK, your gonna need it. THINK BEFORE YOU LEAP, AND HANG UP THAT DAMN PHONE, and more importantly DON'T E-MAIL ANYONE about such matters, and DON"T EVER DISCUSS THESE MATTERS ON SOCIAL MEDIA, like so many novices do. LIMIT YOUR PUBLIC PERSONA TO OFFICIAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH aspect of your activities. REMEMBER GOOGLE is WATCHING AND SAVING EVERY WORD YOU HAVE OR WILL POST PUBLICLY OR PRIVATELY, EVEN IF YOU DON'T SPECIFICALLY USE GOOGLE. [/size]
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by 58chevy » Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:01 pm

My collection is not large enough (less than 100 drawers) or specific enough (no specialty species in large numbers) to be of interest to a major institution. My only options seem to be smaller institutions or "keep it in the family". I don't intend to sell it. Any other suggestions?
Topic: Help identifying this insect (think its a moth) | Author: andy8464 | Replies: 2 | Views: 21
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Re: Help identifying this insect (think its a moth)

by livingplanet3 » Fri Jun 21, 2024 3:00 pm

andy8464 wrote: Fri Jun 21, 2024 10:36 am Hi All,

Appeciate any help in identifying this insect. Likes to sit on walls and seems to become more interested in flight towards the evening. Hopefully picture is clear enough...
This is possibly Tinea pellionella (Casemaking clothes moth) -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/2041674/bgimage

https://bugguide.net/node/view/105076

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinea_pellionella
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by Chuck » Fri Jun 21, 2024 12:19 pm

58chevy wrote: Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:41 pm small natural history museum in my area
It's been my observation that small institutions won't maintain a collection for long. There may be one dedicated person to care for it (if they know how) but once that person is gone, the collection decays. I've seen this several times, with complete collections turned to dust. The size of the institution that can care for such a collection is larger than you'd think- Cornell just picked up a collection from a university that has an annual budget of over a half-billion dollars.

It's probably very good to provide a select set of local specimens for display to educate the locals. But rarities and scientifically valuable collections should go somewhere that hopefully can and will maintain them for many decades (which, as I'd cited above, is increasingly rare and questionable everywhere.)
Topic: Help identifying this insect (think its a moth) | Author: andy8464 | Replies: 2 | Views: 21
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Help identifying this insect (think its a moth)

by andy8464 » Fri Jun 21, 2024 10:36 am

Hi All,

Appeciate any help in identifying this insect. Likes to sit on walls and seems to become more interested in flight towards the evening. Hopefully picture is clear enough.

TIA
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Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by vabrou » Fri Jun 21, 2024 12:16 am

Other things that make collections valuable and highly sought after are.
bilateral aberrants, bilateral gynandromorphs, partial gynandromorphs, Holotypes, Allotypes, Paratypes, Topotypes and two dozen other type designations.
also species new to science, unique specimens, new continent records, new country records, new state records, All of these things more valuable if each is available in very large series.
even unused pins are selling for $60-70.00 per 1000, e.g. I have a spare inventory of 122,000 unused pins right now. That is about $8,000.00 USD today
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Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by vabrou » Thu Jun 20, 2024 11:39 pm

Now there are collections, and there are invaluable collections. And correct, no museum is interested in more luna moths, unless that is if you should have a highly scientific and well prepared and high quality collection of the dozens of world species, and have these available in long series from many geographical locations. If you should have microleps (especially the tiniest of species, high-quality spread on minutens and with full printed data pin labels), these are sought after in large series by most museums because >90% of these are new undescribed species.

It is not just the specimens themselves, but collection storage equipment and accoutrements, and entomological reference libraries as well. In my case, I stored my lifetime's collected biological materials in an old used all electric separate building which housed (5) wooden (Brou, 1993) and (9) (48 drawer) steel cabinets for holding more than 860 Cornell-size specimen glass top storage drawers, and additional shelving units for an additional 50 Cornell-size specimen glass top storage drawers, more than 220 wood Schmidt boxes and more than 600 similar fiber board specimen storage boxes, all requiring round-the-clock, continuous temperature and humidity controls, as well as yearly chemical pest fumigation (Fig. 3). Various hundreds of tweezers, scissors, dissecting and laboratory supplies, two stereo microscopes, etc., were utilized over the past 55 years. Throughout these many decades, all of our entomological research and accomplishments has been documented in scientific journals, newsletters, and other print venues, which resulted in more than ~470 published articles so far. As a result of these investigations, over 400 new to science undescribed insects (mostly moths) were discovered. Between 1971- 2022, around 700,000 of our duplicate wild collected specimens were annually and permanently deposited at the Louisiana State Arthropod Museum, Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Museum, Audubon Institute Butterflies in Flight exhibit (New Orleans), Audubon Insectarium (New Orleans), McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Florida State Collection of Arthropods, United States National Museum (Smithsonian), American Museum Natural History, Carnegie Museum, Los Angeles County Museum, Natural History Museum London, Prague Museum, and various other university collections, as well as hundreds of major private entomological research collections worldwide. Thousands of invaluable taxonomical and rare entomological reference books from the past two+ centuries were needed for research purposes and publication references.

Then there is the lifetime of accumulated collecting equipment, e.g. one highway ready and fully-equipped field trip cargo trailer filled with collecting equipment storage, over 500 self designed, self fabricated insect traps of all types and purposes. These light traps, bait traps, lure traps, malaise traps, bucket traps, pan traps, etc., (nearly all with attached automatic-capture collection chambers) were operated for around 51,000,000 trap-hour, 24 hours daily/365-366 days every year for 55 continuous years. Just to discontinue, clean and store these hundreds of traps took me around three years, pale in comparison to the half century it took design and fabricate these. These traps were used to capture numerous billions of Louisiana insects and such successfully designed traps exist no where else, past or present. Then there are two 35mm film cameras and 13 digital cameras and the hundreds of thousands of high quality of insect images of the specimens, some of which appear in our lifetime of entomological print publications. Then the 4 personal computers, and associated 50+ terabytes of digital data storage. One cannot just throw all this out with the garbage. Future researchers for the next two centuries may find this equipment and data useful, that is if the ever changing hardware and software will allow this. The five gasoline powered electrical alternating current generators used for field trips over the past half century. Our collection here contains more than 400 species of lepidoptera new to science, and things such as this make a collection most sought after. Or e.g. the majority of our tens of thousands of Louisiana butterflies were captured using light traps and other insect traps, unheard of in most other collections. Some materials concentrated upon unlike that seen in other collections, e.g. we have personally captured >400,000 clearwing moths just in our state of Louisiana, and likewise for other families, genera, etc, e.g. there are the thousands of lepidoptera species we recorded as new state species records, new USA records, and the hundreds of captured (>200,0000) Louisiana sphinx moths including many dozens of new state records. I could go on and on, but no doubt you get what I am trying to explain in a limited format as noted here. 55+ years ago I set out to build the largest collection of Louisiana lepidoptera and other insects, all the while having a family, getting an education, and remaining fully employed through all of this. I had a GOAl, and feel I have reached that goal at least minimally. Here is a photo of our 500,000 mostly Louisiana lepidoptera currently retained master research collection. We have all along been pursued by museums far and near. At this point, we are tired. Also attached are a few of the hundreds of insect traps we used, and here is another new Sphinx moth we discovered here at our home around 40 years ago, Lapara abita Brou and Brou 2024, currently due out this year in print (in a few weeks). a. Lapara coniferarum, b. Lapara abita Brou and Brou, c. Lapara phaeobrachycerous Brou, all three from the exact same geographical location, and d. Lapara halicarnie (Florida, USA). Unlike the tens of thousands of Lapara phaeobrachycerous we personally discovered and captured here at our home location, we first captured Lapara abita about four decades ago, but today, this rare species currently exists by only 5 male and 6 female adults from one location, our home in S.E. Louisiana.

By the way, I have sold most of the hundred thousand Louisiana saturnidae, 200,000 Louisiana sphingidae, 100,000+ Louisiana Catocala, 200,000 Louisiana dung beetles and other most very common species. This is how I did something productive with all those hundreds of thousands of very abundant and common species. We sell only in bulk lots of thousands to tens of thousands. We have also donated 348,829 to museums here in the USA ($ value =$ 599,145.26 USD) for which we have all independently appraised for use as legitimate annual tax deductions. Our bulk sales varied over the decades from $100.00 to $29,000.00 each) No onesies and twozies here. size]
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Topic: Inherited a huge collection | Author: CalZap0 | Replies: 4 | Views: 153
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Re: Inherited a huge collection

by Hepialus » Thu Jun 20, 2024 10:17 pm

Depending on species I might be interested in some of these.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 144 | Views: 577345
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Thu Jun 20, 2024 6:02 pm

19june2024; 84F/29C sunny, humid.
Observed: 0
Screw this, I didn't go out. I'm tired of tromping around in the sun for nothing. I saw two this week, so the week gets checked off.

20june2024: 88F/31C sunny, humid.
Observed 1; captured 1
I'm not going to the field today either. Forget it. So I ran errands. Pulling onto our dead-end street I saw a Tiger fly across the road, and alight! I pulled over, grabbed my net and jumped out. It flitted from flowers to flowers on a Elderberry. I caught it.

Image
NYON_HOM_240620

So, what is it- Spring Form, or MST? The black abdominal band seems awfully narrow for Spring Form.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by 58chevy » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:41 pm

I'm in the same boat you're in. I have been corresponding with a small natural history museum in my area. The director is a PhD entomoligist and is eager to expand the museum's insect collection. I'm not ready to let go of my collection yet because I can still maintain it on my own. I'm also still able to do field collecting on a regular basis. But when I can no longer do those things I'll reluctantly donate it to the museum or to my kids, who are not entomologists but are interested in the collection. I also have a fairly good entomological library that includes a few antique books. The library will likely go with the collection. But I still enjoy collecting and will probably regret it if I give away the collection sooner than I have to.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by kevinkk » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:29 pm

None of us expected to get old, I know I was feeling indestructible until my mid 50's, now, not so much.
I have slightly similar concerns, albeit on a far smaller scale.
The books should hold interest and value, a lot of publications are OOP, and still relevant.
My collection is not museum worthy, unless it's some hole in the wall, assuming there is even space, I've seen random cases
in different places, but not worthy of the time many members put into their efforts.
Our things will always mean more to us than others, and there's no way around that.
If I had a lot of papered material, I might try a seller of deadstock for purchasing, it's a logical choice.
Best wishes with your efforts, and to everyone else that time is sneaking up on.
Topic: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 148
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Re: Moving/ downsizing, donating collection, books, getting old

by Trehopr1 » Thu Jun 20, 2024 4:22 pm

Chuck, I imagine wherever you may move to there will be some kind of space which you can use as a hobby room (perhaps a part of a basement space or a smaller third bedroom). It is here that you could save yourself what you regard as "the best for last".

I think you mentioned once that you have around 100 insect drawers. So, maybe say to yourself I'm going to keep 20 or 25 (for example). Those will have the things that YOU personally treasure most. All the rest is then set aside for sale or donation. Then do the same with your remaining insect books in that you keep only those you still enjoy the most. Maybe they only fill one bookshelf or less. Something that again will still fit in a smaller allotted space.

Your collection is as much a part of you as you are a part of it. This has been a lifelong travel. Why not still do a smaller measure of it in your retirement years ? You could still continue enjoying it as one of your hobbies only in a smaller (bite/portion).

Once you have set aside what you really want in both specimens and books then you might try having an "open house" weekend or week where fellow collectors could come out and purchase from you the specimens, books, or drawers that you are willing to part with.

This way no need for any shipping or complaints about mail damage. Prospective buyers see what they have before them and accept it as is and with a price that you can accept. Maybe some package deals or "bundling".

Then with that task out of the way you will see what you have left and you can then decide the further disposition of the specimens and books. Maybe by then you will have already decided where the unwanted things may go.

Additionally, you could try reaching out to collectors and colleagues you know well. See what they may be interested in and just have them pay you an off visit at their convenience. Likely some more sales and the chance to meet-up.

These are just my initial thoughts about downsizing your collection sensibly.

There's certainly nothing wrong with "re-purposing" some of your specimens and books to those fellow collectors/enthusiasts who would truly APPRECIATE having them to add to their collections and to enjoy for many years.

You might be surprised how quickly things will disappear when people have a chance to actually see it and hold it etc.