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Topic: Entomological equipment supplier | Author: wollastoni | Replies: 3 | Views: 94
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Re: Entomological equipment supplier

by wollastoni » Wed May 31, 2023 9:20 am

It works well here.
Are you in Congo now ? His server may decline connections from Central Africa to avoid spamming... I will let Andrew know.
Topic: New Papilio paper | Author: adamcotton | Replies: 26 | Views: 1266
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Re: New Papilio paper

by Leonard187 » Wed May 31, 2023 6:45 am

Thanks for your sharing. As described in this paper, P.syfanius is treated as a separate species now, so albosyfanius from Yunnan is ssp?What about kitawaki from Tibet?
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by daveuk » Wed May 31, 2023 6:15 am

Trehopr1 wrote: Wed May 31, 2023 3:14 am Alas, my final specimen of (4) from DaveUK
is now posted below. A diffrent and (singular)
location. It is likely the same species as my
above specimen from HUE yet, it has a wide
bluish-purple sheen along the outer margins
of the hindwings. This is not present at all
in the specimen from Hue. Both are males.
This species/form is offered very rarely in my experience Trehopr. I think both this one & the previous specimen you posted are forms of Stichophthalma fruhstorferi. As you will know the specimen from Hue is quite a bit smaller than this one. It's a puzzle & one that is unlikely to be solved soon due to the genitalia of all Vietnamese Stichophalma being very similar. As was outlined by Adam Cotton in earlier posts relating to this genus.
When I bid on these specimens last year I missed out on a truly unique form of this one. I kept a picture for reference. From the colouration I think this may possibly even be a hybrid between Stichophthalma howqua & Stichophthalna fruhstorferi. Whoever now owns this specimen has something very special indeed in my opinion.
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Topic: Entomological equipment supplier | Author: wollastoni | Replies: 3 | Views: 94
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Re: Entomological equipment supplier

by Cabintom » Wed May 31, 2023 4:53 am

I'd love to check out what they offer, but anytime I try to load one of their pages my connection times out. (I have no issues with other webpages.)
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Re: The Great Entomological Conundrum: Unit Trays vs. Space Optimization

by Trehopr1 » Wed May 31, 2023 3:49 am

The unit tray (system) works best in a research collection
(museum situation) or in that of a specialists collection
where things are extremely well sorted out due to a
focused interest.

I have incorporated unit trays into a portion of my personal
collection but, limit it to my singleton's, odds-n-ends, vintage/
historical specimens etc. I really do like the compartment
style look and yet somehow it feels like some space is lost...
Probably best to stay with drawers with a full sheet of foam.

Of coarse, ultimately keep only what really "grabs" your interest.
If you wind up collecting "in every direction" that's a recipe for
expense, space issues, and management (upkeep) problems.
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by Trehopr1 » Wed May 31, 2023 3:14 am

Alas, my final specimen of (4) from DaveUK
is now posted below. A diffrent and (singular)
location. It is likely the same species as my
above specimen from HUE yet, it has a wide
bluish-purple sheen along the outer margins
of the hindwings. This is not present at all
in the specimen from Hue. Both are males.

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Re: The Great Entomological Conundrum: Unit Trays vs. Space Optimization

by kevinkk » Wed May 31, 2023 2:43 am

this subject has come up before in some form, I'd never seen or heard of unit trays until it came up in a thread here. I think you don't find out
what system is going to work best until it's a pain in the back to change it. I see the differences, and while I'll never need to worry about it, I like
clean cases with as many options as possible when things get crowded, so- no unit trays for me. I don't pull specimens for study, so I just need to
be careful rearranging things now and then, I just had to rearrange the case of Hyalophora to keep things in order. My specimen placement does have
logic to it, and I try to stick with that as much as possible.
Topic: Cethosia tambora illicibilis | Author: daveuk | Replies: 1 | Views: 31
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Cethosia tambora illicibilis

by daveuk » Tue May 30, 2023 11:06 pm

Two of my males of this unusually coloured subspecies from Alor, Indonesia shown upper & underside.
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The Great Entomological Conundrum: Unit Trays vs. Space Optimization

by entomologist » Tue May 30, 2023 10:27 pm

Greetings, fellow entomology enthusiasts,

Today, I find myself grappling with a vexing question that plagues many of us: should we store our precious insect specimens in unit trays or forgo them altogether in the name of space optimization? It's a dilemma that has sparked numerous debates among seasoned collectors, each championing their preferred approach. As I stand at this crossroads, I invite you to join me in pondering the pros and cons of each method, seeking wisdom from the collective expertise.

Unit trays have long been hailed as a convenient tool for organizing and preserving insect specimens. These trays, with their neatly arranged compartments, allow us to categorize our bugs by species, region, or any other desired classification. They help maintain order, facilitate identification, and safeguard the delicate specimens from potential damage during storage or transportation. However, the use of unit trays does come at a cost—both in terms of monetary investment and the need for additional storage space.

On the other hand, there is a school of thought that argues forgoing unit trays can be a viable solution to save on valuable storage space. Without the trays, specimens can be stored directly in drawers, maximizing the utilization of available area. This approach is particularly appealing when dealing with limited storage options or unique drawer sizes, such as the ones I have encountered with my self-made drawers. However, it is crucial to consider potential drawbacks, such as increased vulnerability to physical damage or difficulties in locating specific specimens amidst a more chaotic arrangement.

As I contemplate my next move, I invite your input and suggestions. Have you found a creative compromise that marries the benefits of unit trays with efficient space utilization? How do you strike the balance between organization and practicality? Perhaps you have innovative storage solutions or alternative methods that have proved successful in your own entomological endeavors. I am eager to hear your experiences and insights as we navigate this entomological puzzle together.

Inquisitively yours,
Ed


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Topic: A taste of the dark side: BEETLES!! | Author: entomologist | Replies: 1 | Views: 30
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A taste of the dark side: BEETLES!!

by entomologist » Tue May 30, 2023 10:10 pm

Hey there, fellow bug aficionados!

You won't believe the predicament I've found myself in! Picture this: I stumble upon a box of spread-out, yet sadly unpinned beetles. Naturally, my mischievous side kicks in, and I think, "Why not give them the full entomological treatment and stick some pins in them?" Voila, they're ready for their fancy display cases. My goliath beetles are still in the degreasing process. But hey, in the meantime, behold these fascinating beetles I've wrangled! Rest assured, my fellow lepidopterists, my heart remains loyal to the fluttering wonders. It would take a grand conspiracy or an army of beetles armed with tiny pitchforks to lure me to the dark side of the beetles. Trust me, it would take a lot of convincing!

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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 48 | Views: 1705
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Tue May 30, 2023 5:58 pm

2023, here we go again. I figured I'd keep notes here, just in case it ever helps someone.

The batch of Finger Lakes Tigers dropped off at UK last November for genetic analysis still sit frozen. Since there's no funding (grant, etc.) for this, it would have to be a side job. So seven months later, nothing. I may be out in the field in 2023 for nothing, and it's pretty disheartening.

2023 work started with a trip to Carnegie MNH. It wasn't about Tigers, but a quick on-the-way-out-the-door look at the Tigers was intriguing; a nice black female gynandromorph; several wild-capture Insufficient Scale Quota (ISQ; Perlman) which demonstrated my ISQ was not even close to being the first wild capture; and several other specimens that made me wonder...

Side trips to Huntsville, San Antonio, and KY yielded no captures. Also, without arguing about when Spring is in TX, in all locations the Tigers all acted like our Spring Tigers- not nectaring, just blasting along at full speed. It seems consistent with Spring brood.

The first sighting in Finger Lakes in 2023 was in Wayne Co: Marion, 21 May late afternoon following recovery from a cold front.

Second sighting was Ontario Co. E. Victor, 26 May.

Subsequent (today), three in one hour Ontario Co., E. Victor, 30 May.

Thus far, no canadensis have been observed on the Lake Ontario (Wayne Co.) shoreline. My few previous captures have all been in May, but this year I've not even seen one.

In my mind, I've divided the earliest mid-May Tigers in Ontario Co. as potentially canadensis. However, not a one seen. And since the first I saw in Ontario County was 26 May, well that puts it into Spring Form timeframe, approximately. May was horrible weather, so who knows what happened to the Tigers.

As always, it's "sightings" not captures. Usually by the end of May they'd be nectaring on Lilac, but I haven't observed a single Tiger nectaring on anything, just flying from somewhere to somewhere else, and in a hurry.

........

Coming back from today's field trip, I'm just not into it. More days out sweating, blood pressure pounding, have to shower afterwards and check for ticks. I think of last year- something like 40 days before a capture. Ugh. Year four of this study has barely started and it's already old.
Topic: Entomological equipment supplier | Author: wollastoni | Replies: 3 | Views: 94
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Entomological equipment supplier

by wollastoni » Tue May 30, 2023 12:10 pm

Since the closure of Bioquip equipment, a lot of us have been looking for a serious entomological material supplier.

Testing several of them, I have found that the Canadian supplier "Moth & Beetle", runned by Andrew Koeslag, is doing a very good job.
After some commercial discussion with Andrew, he has decided to become an InsectNet sponsor and we now promote his products on our new equipment page : Entomological equipment

He has a nice selection of all important equipment to run a serious insect collection (nets, spreading boards, pins, forceps...) and tells me he is trying to add more and more material now.
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by Trehopr1 » Tue May 30, 2023 1:40 am

Thank you for your sentiments Dave !

On this holiday here our sentiments are that All gave some, Some gave all....
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by Paul K » Tue May 30, 2023 12:08 am

Stichopthalma are seasonal and very localized butterflies.
You have to be in the right place and time to see them.
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by daveuk » Mon May 29, 2023 9:18 pm

I visited Da Nang in 2008 Trehopr. From there I went inland to Hoi An & some mountains nearby. I was very impressed with the variety of butterflies I saw in that part of the world. Sadly I did not see any Stichophthalma & have yet to see any species of this genus on the wing.
Poignant that you should mention Viet Nam in an historical context today Trehopr which I know is Memorial Day for all of you there in the U.S.A. I am sparing a thought from this side of the pond for U.S. veterans & all those who suffered & died serving their country.
Topic: Wings and Wonders: Chasing Butterflies in Japan | Author: entomologist | Replies: 2 | Views: 105
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Re: Wings and Wonders: Chasing Butterflies in Japan

by bobw » Mon May 29, 2023 7:51 am

You certainly know how to write!
Topic: Wings and Wonders: Chasing Butterflies in Japan | Author: entomologist | Replies: 2 | Views: 105
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Wings and Wonders: Chasing Butterflies in Japan

by entomologist » Mon May 29, 2023 3:15 am

Greetings, fellow adventurers!

I come bearing exciting news! I have made the decision to embark on a thrilling blogging journey, where I will document my captivating expeditions and share the wonders of the natural world. And what better place to announce this endeavor than here, among kindred spirits who understand the thrill of exploration?

While I won't be able to attach pictures directly to this forum post (it's a little complex here, you know), fear not! I have prepared a slideshow that showcases the breathtaking visuals that accompany my adventures.

To view the mesmerizing photographs, simply click on the link below and let the slideshow transport you to the enchanting landscapes I have encountered.
https://edtomology.wixsite.com/edtomolo ... s-in-japan



City 1: Osaka - A City of Surprises and Fluttering Beauties
After a long flight that seemed to span across oceans and time zones, I finally set foot in the vibrant city of Osaka. The moment I stepped off the plane and into this bustling metropolis, I felt a surge of energy coursing through my veins. Osaka was a thriving hub of modernity and tradition, where skyscrapers reached for the heavens, yet nature's touch was never far away.
Surrounded by an oasis of lush greenery, the city seemed to strike a harmonious balance between the man-made and the natural. The contrast between the ordered chaos of the urban landscape and the serene beauty of the surrounding foliage left me in awe. It was as if I had entered a world where the old and the new danced together, embracing each other's strengths.
While I reveled in the impeccable orderliness of Osaka and marveled at the seamless fusion of Japanese culture in its streets, there was a tingling excitement that pulsed within me. It was the thrill of the butterfly chase that awaited me, a quest to witness the delicate creatures in their natural habitat and capture their ephemeral beauty.
As I ascended the iconic Umeda Sky Building, its towering presence reaching towards the heavens, I couldn't help but be captivated by the mirrored windows that reflected the surrounding cityscape. The breathtaking views that unfolded before my eyes filled me with a sense of wonder. But amidst the urban jungle that stretched as far as the eye could see, my gaze was drawn to a small, charming park nestled adjacent to the tower—a hidden gem awaiting my arrival.
With a determined stride, I descended from the heights of the Umeda Sky Building and made my way towards that enchanting park. Every step was filled with anticipation, as if the fluttering of butterfly wings whispered secrets of the treasures that lay ahead. And there, as if by some stroke of serendipity, I found myself immersed in a realm teeming with life—my own butterfly kingdom.
Pieris rapae cabbage whites, with their delicate white wings, dominated the scene, their graceful flight patterns a sight to behold. But they were not alone in this symphony of color and motion. A captivating variety of lycaenidae, with their azure hues, painted the air with bursts of brilliance. Occasionally, fritillaries and papilios emerged from the verdant foliage, like winged jewels adorning nature's crown.
The hours slipped away unnoticed as I immersed myself in this captivating world of butterflies. Each delicate capture added to the growing assortment in my collection, a testament to the rich biodiversity that could be found even within the heart of a metropolis like Osaka.
But Osaka, for all its splendor, was not renowned for its abundance of butterflies. It was a city that dazzled in countless ways, but not for its winged wonders. And yet, that made the discovery all the more special. The fact that I had stumbled upon these magnificent creatures within its urban landscape left me pleasantly surprised and invigorated.
As the days unfolded, I continued to indulge in Osaka's cultural delights—savoring its delectable street food, immersing myself in the vibrant atmosphere of its markets, and exploring its historical landmarks. But my heart longed for the next leg of my journey, for the allure of adventure beckoned once again.
And so, with my collection of butterflies as a testament to the beauty that can be found even in unexpected places, I bid farewell to Osaka, ready to delve deeper into the mysteries that awaited me in the uncharted territories of the world. The butterfly chase had only just begun, and I was eager to see where its wings would carry me next.

City 2: Kinosaki - A Haven for Hot Springs and Fluttering Gems
Stepping onto the platform, the rhythmic chugging of the train filled my ears, signaling the beginning of another thrilling chapter in my adventure. I was bound for the enchanting hot spring town of Kinosaki—a hidden gem nestled amidst the picturesque landscapes of Japan. As the locomotive hummed with anticipation, I couldn't help but feel a surge of excitement coursing through my veins, eager to immerse myself in the warm embrace of this small but mighty city.
Kinosaki greeted me with open arms, its residents radiating a genuine warmth and hospitality that instantly made me feel at home. The streets were lined with traditional ryokans, their wooden facades exuding timeless charm, and the air was filled with a soothing tranquility that seemed to envelop every passerby. But it was the scent that wafted through the town—a tantalizing blend of lavender and humidity—that captured my senses, beckoning me closer to the source of relaxation and rejuvenation.
Hot springs were the lifeblood of Kinosaki, and they revealed themselves in abundance. From the moment I slipped into the silky embrace of the first bath, all my worries melted away, carried by the gentle steam rising from the mineral-rich waters. Each soak transported me to a world of serenity, where time seemed to stand still and the cares of the outside world vanished like distant echoes.
But Kinosaki was more than just a haven for hot springs. It was a culinary paradise that delighted even the most discerning palates. I indulged in a feast of perfectly marbled steak, each tender morsel bursting with flavor, and savored the succulent crab that adorned a bed of fragrant rice. And the artistry displayed in the fruit displays, meticulously crafted and arranged like vibrant still-life paintings, left me in awe. Guilty pleasures mingled with pure gratification as I relished every delectable bite.
Driven by the presence of butterflies that danced on the breeze, I followed their whimsical flight to a secluded hilly area near a cemetery—a hidden paradise that seemed untouched by time. It was there that Cephonodes hylas, known as "Oosukashiba" in Japanese, graced my net with their ethereal presence. Their delicate wings fluttered like whispers of beauty against the backdrop of nature's canvas. And among them, I encountered the elusive Macroglossum, their wings shimmering like delicate silk threads spun by a master weaver.
Lost in the enchantment of my pursuit, I was startled by the approach of an elderly gentleman. His face wore a weathered smile, a testament to a life well-lived, and his eyes sparkled with curiosity as he observed my net-swinging with evident approval. Before I could fully comprehend his intentions, he disappeared momentarily, only to return moments later, accompanied by a young child. The child, wide-eyed with wonder, cradled a magnificent rhinoceros beetle (A. dichotoma) in his hands—a creature whose size rivaled his own palm. It was a surreal sight, the innocence and marvel of youth intersecting with my own passion for the natural world.
In a beautiful exchange that transcended language barriers, we communicated through a shared love for insects. Our limited vocabulary melted away as our eyes met, and we exchanged nods of mutual admiration for the creatures that captivated our hearts. I accepted the unexpected gift, uttering a heartfelt "arigato" in my rusty Japanese, and marveled at the preserved beauty of the rhinoceros beetle. Safely tucked away in my bag, this treasure joined the growing assortment of wonders I had collected. It was a kabutomushi, a giant beetle commonly kept as a pet in Japan, as I later discovered—an emblem of strength and resilience in the natural world.
With the rhinoceros beetle nestled among my other finds, our encounter became a cherished memory, a reminder of the unexpected connections that can be forged in the pursuit of adventure. It was a testament to the power of shared passions and the universal language of curiosity and wonder.
But as much as my heart longed to linger in Kinosaki's embrace, the call of new horizons beckoned me forward. Kyoto, a city steeped in history and tradition, awaited my arrival. So, with a mix of reluctance and anticipation, I bid farewell to the hot springs and the delightful town that had left an indelible mark on my soul.

City 3: Kyoto - Temples and Nocturnal Delights
In Kyoto, my stay was but a fleeting moment, yet its impact was etched into the depths of my being. As I wandered through the storied temples and intricate city streets, a sense of reverence and awe embraced me. The allure of Kyoto was irresistible, an intoxicating blend of history, tradition, and natural beauty. Its ancient temples, adorned with intricate architectural details and nestled in serene gardens, whispered stories of the past and carried the weight of generations. Each step I took was an exploration of both the tangible and intangible, as if the very air was infused with the echoes of centuries gone by.
In this ethereal atmosphere, I embarked on my butterfly chase, guided by the delicate wings that danced in harmony with the wind. The lush foliage that surrounded Kyoto's temples provided the perfect habitat for these mesmerizing creatures, their vibrant colors and intricate patterns blending seamlessly with the verdant landscape.
With net in hand, I ventured into the sacred grounds, my senses heightened by the interplay of light and shadow, the fragrance of incense, and the distant whispers of prayers. The day moths, with their delicate beauty, seemed to embody the essence of Kyoto itself—a delicate balance between tranquility and vitality.
As I carefully collected each specimen, my heart raced with a mixture of exhilaration and reverence. These fleeting moments of connection with nature's wonders were treasures to be cherished. The day moths, with their intricate wing patterns and subtle hues, were like living works of art, a testament to the exquisite beauty that could be found even in the smallest corners of the world.
Yet, my time in Kyoto was all too brief. As the hours passed, I found myself yearning for more—more time to explore the hidden pockets of the city, to witness the ephemeral beauty of its cherry blossoms in full bloom, and to immerse myself in the ancient rituals and customs that unfolded with each passing moment.
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by Trehopr1 » Mon May 29, 2023 1:01 am

Another, really great prize to receive from Dave as well
is this altogather "new" for me (species) of Stichopthalma.
The (male) of the species here is in both color and pattern
diffrent from everything else I have acquired.

If you look closely where the wings meet you can clearly
see the androconial tufts near the base of the hindwings.

Image

This is yet another find curious for its military historical past.
Its capture location is Hue province Vietnam.The ancient city
of Hue was over-run by communist forces during the Tet offensive
of early 1968. Over the coarse of a month they were gradually
driven out however, this city with significant architectural shrines
and buildings was VIRTUALLY destroyed in the process.

Vietnam certainly seems to have been graced with a plethora
of Stichopthalma species, variations, or even seasonal forms.
I can only feebly attempt through my photographs to convey
their magnificence and my continued interest in these asian
"Jungle Queens".
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by Trehopr1 » Mon May 29, 2023 12:19 am

Here is another of Dave's specimens. This is the only
(female) example of which I have of this species. All
my other examples which look similar to this one are
clearly (males); judging by the evidence of their
androconial tufts (of hairs) which are present where
both sets of wings meet along the perpendicular line
and near the base of the hindwings.

Image

I'm quite excited to have an actual specimen from Da Nang
province Vietnam. For we Americans Da Nang Vietnam has a
certain historical importance about it. It was on the beachhead
of Da Nang on March.08.1965 that the first American combat
forces came ashore.

As a history (minor) I have always been especially
keen on military history from WW1 and forward.
Vietnam has ALWAYS peaked my interest most as I
saw it firsthand on T.V. practically every night in my
youth.

Da Nang would be the most northerly major air base in the
Republic of Vietnam and only 85 miles south of the DMZ.
In time, communist forces of the north would build a series
of underground tunnel complexes under portions of the base
to avoid being "bombed" and to conduct harassment missions.
Topic: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 34 | Views: 830
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Re: Some of my recent "papered" Stichopthalma

by daveuk » Sun May 28, 2023 10:00 pm

Trehopr1 wrote: Sun May 28, 2023 8:18 pm Having recently completed my "setting work" on my
papered Stichopthalma acquisitions I was for a lack of
drawers to place them in. So, until such time as I am
able to buy new drawers I have housed my specimens
in 3 snap-tight (locking lid) tupperware containers.

Here is how each container looks. In addition, to my
original batch of Stichopthalma I was "gifted" a selection
of 4 additional ones in a recent trade with my friend
and fellow Insectnet member (DaveUK). The (female)
S. uemurai located on the bottom row (center) is one
of Dave's very kind gifts.



Dave's other 3 specimens come from locations/areas in
Vietnam for which I have no specimens from. They are
diffrent from anything else I've acquired thus far and I will
show them in a day or so upon their removals from the
boards.

Close-up of Dave's (female) S. uemurai


Thank you DaveUK for your kind thoughtfulness and
help with these butterflies !
You are welcome Trehopr. I got a very good trade from yourself for them too. You did a wonderful setting job on all of them