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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 168 | Views: 586790
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Wed Jul 24, 2024 8:43 pm

23july24: didn't go out, rained in afternoon.

24july24: 82F/28C, partly sunny T storm looming
Observed 5, capture 3 (1M 2F all on Bergamot) the two I didn't catch were on the forest edge; those I did catch exhibited the End-of-Bergamot-Blues: hopping 10m again and again to find a bloom they like.

This week reflects the same week of 2023, and I copy/paste: "But I checked the Teasel fields, and the Cup Plant field, nothing. Where are they?? This day last year [2022] was the second-highest capture of 2022. Where are they? Where did they go?"

But if this year follows past years, this week's low will be followed by next week's increase. However I'll not be afield then.

Only saw a few troilus, both M and F, which is way down from the 2022 population explosion.
Topic: A parade of Catocala moths | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 65 | Views: 9391
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Re: A parade of Catocala moths

by Trehopr1 » Wed Jul 24, 2024 8:24 pm

Thank you very much Vernon for showing us the parade of smaller species which you have been able to get (in some numbers) in Louisiana. Living in a rural region with plenty of "natural" tracts of native trees and vegetation certainly produces a pallete of species which are not to be seen at least in the upper Midwest where I live (Illinois). Some of these could be native to only the Gulf States region....

Your specimens certainly look very "minty" so the en-masse collecting that you do combined with the ULTIMATE knockdown agent has provided you with some incredible personal series of otherwise hard to find species. 👍👏☺️
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by Chuck » Wed Jul 24, 2024 3:17 pm

Wow, just my opinion, but I'd restore that upper covered walkout and the lower porch and railings too. Can't be tough after all you've done! LOL. Stunning, thanks for taking the time to share photos. Beats photos of skippers :D :D :D
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by kevinkk » Wed Jul 24, 2024 3:08 pm

Pretty cool house Jshuey.
I can see the "Vicky" in the black and white picture. I've seen a lot of them when I lived and worked in northern Calif. every time we
had to go to Ferndale, it was a mixed blessing, those things are not easy to put roofs on, but they were always different.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by Jshuey » Wed Jul 24, 2024 2:26 pm

Chuck wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2024 11:46 am Clearly the original owner poured a ton of money into architecture and construction- but what style is it? I've never seen anything like it.
So..., it was built as a typical Queen Ann Victorian with all he gingerbread and stuff sometime in the 1880's. But in the 1920's, it was remodeled into a "modern" house that was like an American four-square - only wood (I'm surrounded by brick four-squares). At that point, they ripped off the wrap around porch and removed the peaks from the roof line and completely reworked the interior. Interestingly, much of the new woodwork, the windows and the fireplace facades were secondhand, so they painted everything (and put stucco on the griffin fireplace). They did the whole nine yards - adding a new (but previously used) grand staircase that they painted lime green, those arches, new (used) windows, wool carpet over the parquet floors, - you name it - anything that was upper-class fashionable back in the roaring 20's.

We purchased the place in 2000 after 80 years of neglect (probably more like 40 years that the previous owners lived there). We ripped out the carpet to find the floors, stripped most of the woodwork that was oak, stripped the stairway, faux-grained the parts of the woodwork that was poplar, stripped the fireplaces, and rebuilt the parts that were literally falling down (there was an alcove in the kitchen, where if you looked up, you saw the sky, and if you looked down, the dirt craw-space). My wife led much of the work herself and coordinated the contractors that did the real heavy lifting. There are still a lot of things that are not quite completed - mostly details.


The exterior was nicer before the remodel for sure! This is the "official" street-facing side of the house - although we really live in the back. I had a really hard time convincing our son (at ~ 10 years old) which side was which - since he grew up on the back patio (and it also faces a street).
Image
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by Chuck » Wed Jul 24, 2024 11:46 am

John, incredibly impressive. If I saw the "before" photo 20 years ago I'd have driven you straight to the state hospital and had you committed. There is NO WAY I'd even think of tackling a reconstruction of that magnitude.

The results are astonishing- that building IS a museum itself. Clearly the original owner poured a ton of money into architecture and construction- but what style is it? I've never seen anything like it.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by Jshuey » Tue Jul 23, 2024 5:44 pm

We purchased this house at an estate auction. If you hold your hand up long enough, you will quickly discover who the biggest idiot in the room is... . The contents were also auctioned off, and the owners were hoarders. So, people bought piles of stuff cheap, took the one item they wanted, and left the rest for us! I filled a 40 cubic yard dumpster so full that the driver made me re-pack it before he would hull it away. You can probably tell which photos are the before picture, and then the 20 years after picture. It has been a serious piece of work.

Back Yard
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Living room
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Powder room
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Topic: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 3 | Views: 89
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Re: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity

by kevinkk » Tue Jul 23, 2024 3:27 pm

Interesting, anything living in the Namib is going to be resilient. I read somewhere, that I can't find at the moment, that Coelocnemis can go
2 years, in captivity, of course, I don't think you can measure the lifespan of wild animals very easily, or with accuracy.
Well, hopefully I won't need provisions in my will for any long lived insects.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 8:28 pm

Jshuey wrote: Mon Jul 22, 2024 5:27 pm five hand-carved fireplaces
THOSE are friggin' impressive! Now that's a museum when even the building is vintage! Very cool. Love to see more.
Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 208
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Re: Strange aberration

by 58chevy » Mon Jul 22, 2024 8:01 pm

Very enlightening commentary on aberrations/morphotypes/phenotypes, etc. Good food for thought.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 168 | Views: 586790
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 6:14 pm

20-21july2024: 80F sunny, no rain
1 observed in Wayne Co, I did not go afield.

22july2024: 84F/29C, sunny.
3 observed: 1F (worn) on Bergamot; 2 fighting a while in forest, primary hilltop. Where are they? I checked the Teasel and Yellow Cup Plant fields, nothing. This low count would jive with with a drop in population in late July that I've observed previous years; we will see.

Also captured a large fresh P cresphontes, the first I've ever seen in NY nectaring (on Bergamot) in a field.
Topic: Do you own a museum? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 10 | Views: 333
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Re: Do you own a museum?

by Jshuey » Mon Jul 22, 2024 5:27 pm

Again – it all sounds familiar. Forget the collection, our living space is full of museum-like stuff (not so much museum quality though!). And our 140-year old house itself has a lot of detailing you won’t find in most places - like parquet floors, five hand-carved fireplaces, bay windows, leaded glass and so on. All in very poor condition when we purchased the place, but since restored!
In keeping with the spirit of the house, for most of the house we buy quality “old stuff” that blends in with the house proper. Our furniture averages perhaps 150 years old – typically with hand-carved detailing. Antique wool rugs from the Middle East. Decent original art ranging from a couple old Dutch oils and a handful of regional impressionistic stuff from the 30’s and 40’s. We used to love traveling to auctions and buying stuff like this, but also because when you buy quality furnishings “second hand” – they retain value.
And just like many museums, we have a hard time de-accessioning stuff. We need a rule that says “something has to go” if you buy something that adds to the craziness.
John
Image
Before – Fireplace sprayed with stucco for some crazy reason.
After - English Oak Griffin, antique African effigy - plus santa uses this fireplace!
Topic: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 3 | Views: 89
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Re: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity

by livingplanet3 » Mon Jul 22, 2024 4:45 pm

Long ago, I heard from a colleague that some adult darkling beetles have been known to live for at least 15 years, but I'm not sure of the origin of this claim, and can't give a reference. Possibly though, it came from long-term studies of tenebrionid species in the Namib Desert, which may have started as far back as the 1960s, at the Gobabeb Research Institute founded by Austrian entomologist Charles Koch (1904–1970).
Topic: Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 3 | Views: 89
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Coelocnemis dilaticollis longevity

by kevinkk » Mon Jul 22, 2024 4:13 pm

On June 21rst of 2022 I picked up this beetle at Lost Lake in Linn county Oregon, the elevation is about 3500 f.
I didn't find a lot about care, so I have had it in a large enclosure with some forest substrate, dry plant material and mist the whole thing from time to time. It's still going, and walks around in the evenings.
I'll look for a biotope picture and try to get that on this as well. It's been a nice pet, very low maintenance, my Great Grig was in the same enclosure
for a time, also found at the same location, but it apparently perished and the ants got to it before I did.
So, this beetle has been doing well, by any means, for over 2 years at this point.
beetle 2024 A.JPG
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Lost Lake Biotope.JPG
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Topic: Strange aberration | Author: 58chevy | Replies: 6 | Views: 208
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Re: Strange aberration

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 11:43 am

Thanks, Vernon. I used to think I had a nice series of Apantesis phalerata until I saw yours.
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 20 | Views: 3038
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Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by Chuck » Mon Jul 22, 2024 11:39 am

vabrou wrote: Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:21 pm billions of mercury vapor and similar lights over two centuries... lights seen from indoors through windows, ... hundreds of thousands of malls and gasoline stations
We know that some moths are not much attracted to MV; cecropia for example is more likely to be found at incandescent and metal halide. But for the most part, Saturnids and Sphingids are more likely to come to MV.

That said, they of course do come to porch lights and windows, including to LED. I suppose with enough local home lights it could reduce the quantity coming to my MV.

Still, with MV being by far the most attracting, our area converted to MH some 30 years ago. This was a pain, as the number of gas stations and such worth checking in the morning dropped and dropped until it hit zero. Now with commercial lighting (eg malls, gas stations, auto dealers) converted or converting to LED, I've not seen an increase in the moths flying around lights at night.

In our area, there has been an increase in both commercial lighting and new homes (LED, mostly) though there's a minimum .75km of thick deciduous forest between my MV and these places.

There may be a correlation between being attracted to lights and where the moths lay eggs. I don't know, but I'd not be surprised. If that were the case, one would think I'd still find promethea and cecropia cocoons in the back yard, but I do not.

If the new MH and LED lights in the area impacted all moths equally, and were the cause of loss at my MV, I'd expect to also see a marked drop in Catocala and Arctids, but I do not, those quantities at my MV are unchanged.

So while I have no doubt that an increase in regional lighting does have some impact on Saturnid populations, I doubt it's in the top three factors for the populations decreases.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 84
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Re: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by livingplanet3 » Sun Jul 21, 2024 10:23 pm

A non-biting midge of the family Chironomidae -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chironomidae
Topic: What's up with US Saturniidae? | Author: lamprima2 | Replies: 20 | Views: 3038
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Re: What's up with US Saturniidae?

by adamcotton » Sun Jul 21, 2024 8:17 pm

If that is correct, over the long term moth numbers should gradually recover as light sources are modernised to be less attractive to insects in general.

I suspect that both the introduced parasitoid and light pollution are only two of a myriad of different factors causing decline in population numbers.

Adam.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 84
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Re: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by adamcotton » Sun Jul 21, 2024 8:11 pm

Welcome to Insectnet.

It looks like a mosquito, probably male, or at least a closely related Dipteran.

I am sure one of our more knowledgeable local US members can give you a much better identification than I can from the other side of the World.

Adam.
Topic: Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York | Author: PhoenixBugs | Replies: 3 | Views: 84
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Complete Unknown Bug- Ithaca, New York

by PhoenixBugs » Sun Jul 21, 2024 7:33 pm

Hello! This is my first time on the forum, and I am still relatively new to insect photography/identification (about a half year now). I love the photography- I still primarily shoot birds and other large wildlife, but insects have been a new addition to my passions. However, I am sorely incapable of identification as of yet, so I'm hoping I could get some help on here!
Here is a few angles of some insect that I spotted on a small leafy bush in Ithaca, New York. It is very small (a few millimeters at most). I would love to hear anyone's thoughts on what it is (maybe it's obvious to others, haha)! I would also truly appreciate any good resources for learning how to identify insects in the future :)
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