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Topic: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 22
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KKarns
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Re: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers?

by KKarns » Fri Aug 12, 2022 4:55 pm

Hey Trehopr1, I have run a hanging flight intercept trap in the canopy at my property in SE Ohio for beetles. I haven't found anything that I haven't encountered otherwise. Although I have collected a few interesting species in series in the canopy that I had only collected individuals here and there of. The trap was fun to service and was positioned about 75 feet up in some upland hardwoods.
Topic: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 22
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Trehopr1
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Re: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers?

by Trehopr1 » Fri Aug 12, 2022 4:08 pm

So far as I know (here in the eastern half of the US) a few species of Lycaenidae are primarily canopy dwellers. Aside from that I've never really read or heard of much else.

To a degree I would say that Papilio glaucus is probably our most arboreal swallowtail species as I have many times sighted them flying way out of reach coming in or out of forest margins.
Topic: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 22
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Re: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers?

by kevinkk » Fri Aug 12, 2022 3:35 pm

Maybe it's the flora and differences between the way animals evolved in the tropics, I've never thought about it before, but the same thing
exists here in the western USA, of course some species like Admirals will perch just out of reach, but really nothing you couldn't swing at with a long net handle.
Topic: Papilio machaon, long time ago | Author: joachim | Replies: 1 | Views: 8
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Papilio machaon, long time ago

by joachim » Fri Aug 12, 2022 2:37 pm

https://e1.pcloud.link/publink/show?cod ... OPD4y4JzrV
This is not an extraordinary butterfly but it was the first butterfly I bred when I was 15. At that time the machaon was found in every garden. Here I saw the last one 8 years ago.
Joachim
Topic: Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 4 | Views: 22
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Chuck
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Where are the Northeast USA canopy dwellers?

by Chuck » Fri Aug 12, 2022 1:56 pm

It strikes me as odd that I see really no canopy activity in NE USA.

In the tropics, it's very typical to look up at the canopy and see all manner of Leps, many unreachable. I watched one mango tree for years and always saw some sort of Lycaenid flying around 20m up, but it took ten years to catch one of the buggers. Further, I'd see O victoriae, and graphium, flying up high, very rarely coming to ground level.

But not in NE USA. I sit on my deck and can see the edge of the forest canopy, and there's nothing up there. Odd, since the whole region was, in pre-Colombian times, covered with tall forest. OK, I'm sure someone will cite some species that prefers canopy, but when I look at it, it's void of leps.

Thoughts?
Topic: Papilio machaonides | Author: daveuk | Replies: 15 | Views: 282
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Re: Papilio machaonides

by Chuck » Fri Aug 12, 2022 11:59 am

Sorry to go off topic, but since it already is: I observed Papilio demoleus circa 2002 at El Yunque, Puerto Rico; I noted it to Dr. Miller, and she indicated it was the first such observation in PR; subsequently, I've stumbled across several other observations of the species in PR.

A quick search on iNat shows demoleus throughout the main Carib islands; one record from Louisiana. https://www.inaturalist.org/observation ... n_id=51583
Topic: Exploring Hemileuca eglanterina Country | Author: neominois | Replies: 6 | Views: 107
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Re: Exploring Hemileuca eglanterina Country

by Chuck » Fri Aug 12, 2022 11:53 am

Great video, and timely! I was on exhausting travel with interrupted internet access, only my phone, and with only 10 minutes of down time before sleep, and watched it twice.

The editing is amazingly professional- very impressive!

I was surprised at the large size of eglanterina. Our local Hemileuca maia menyanthevora (Pavulaan, 2020) is much smaller, and almost extinct.

My gosh your daughter is getting older. It's great she accompanies you; my daughter will go with me if I stick to easy terrain like you show, but unfortunately most of my field work is in horrible thorns, thistles, and nettles. So fortunate you are!
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Re: Disinfection and cleaning of butterflies in frames or boxes

by joachim » Fri Aug 12, 2022 10:03 am

Hello, thank you, I know the procedure but I have no way to freeze anything, we bnneed the fridge for food and have no room for another. Therefore my question about poison gas or other gas.
Topic: Papilio machaonides | Author: daveuk | Replies: 15 | Views: 282
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Re: Papilio machaonides

by adamcotton » Fri Aug 12, 2022 9:11 am

eurytides wrote: Fri Aug 12, 2022 1:49 am There have also been several reports from the US mainland.
I hadn't heard of any recent reports from the US mainland. There was one report in California (I seem to remember) many years ago, and that was presumed to be a single escapee. Have any recent US records been published?

Adam.
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Re: Disinfection and cleaning of butterflies in frames or boxes

by adamcotton » Fri Aug 12, 2022 9:05 am

Put the whole frame in a sealed plastic bag or box and freeze it for about a week, take the frame still sealed in its container out of the freezer for a week then put it back in the freezer for another week. Any eggs that may have survived the first freezing will hatch, and the second freeze will kill the larvae.

After the second freeze remove the frame (still sealed in its container) from the freezer and place it in the room for 24 hours before opening the bag/box and taking the frame out. That will prevent condensation from humidity in the air reaching the frame before the temperature has equalised.

Adam.
Topic: Exploring Hemileuca eglanterina Country | Author: neominois | Replies: 6 | Views: 107
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Re: Exploring Hemileuca eglanterina Country

by neominois » Fri Aug 12, 2022 2:40 am

Thanks John!

I appreciate the kind words! My daughter and I just enjoy recording as we explore. The sheep moths were quite a surprise. Usually they are hard to catch. They fly quickly. I brought home 5 specimens that were so fresh I collected with my hands.

Eurytides is correct, they are all on my YouTube Channel (Along with many Anatomy Videos you want to ignore).
Topic: Papilio machaonides | Author: daveuk | Replies: 15 | Views: 282
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Re: Papilio machaonides

by eurytides » Fri Aug 12, 2022 1:49 am

That species is now established on many islands of the Caribbean. There have also been several reports from the US mainland.
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Re: Disinfection and cleaning of butterflies in frames or boxes

by Trehopr1 » Fri Aug 12, 2022 12:13 am

Indeed, as Paul says that's all you need to do.

That looks to be a wonderful piece and I'll bet it was well put together because if it was not it would already be dust by now.

Unless you have plans of putting it on a pin for your collection I would leave it as it is. The colors look pretty good still and the species is awesome !

It appears to lay on a nice soft bed of cotton rather than having it simply glued in place (which is what most framers do).

Hey it's a VERY NICE vintage piece which looks good as is so, why mess with a good thing? You could still hang it in a room that doesn't have very much natural light exposure or leave it in a cabinet to admire.

What an amazing find and a pretty darn expensive item to get these days.
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Re: Disinfection and cleaning of butterflies in frames or boxes

by Paul K » Thu Aug 11, 2022 11:53 pm

Just freeze it
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Re: Disinfection and cleaning of butterflies in frames or boxes

by joachim » Thu Aug 11, 2022 11:44 pm

P.S. Or does anyone have an idea to take the moth out of the frame and prepare it? This is almost a surgical operation, was relatively expensive, so "no risk no fun?".
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Disinfection and cleaning of butterflies in frames or boxes

by joachim » Thu Aug 11, 2022 11:41 pm

Hello, I was able to acquire this specimen last week, probably from 1969 or 1970. My question is (I have several such frames and small boxes, which I do not want to open, but could possibly have pest infestation) how they can be disinfected. My idea was to expose everything in airtight plastic bags (plastic boxes) to a toxic gas. I used to do this with dry ice (CO2), but that was a long time ago and it is hard to get now.
Does anyone have any ideas? Cyanide, chlorine or anything else is too dangerous for me. But I don't want the moths or other moths to be damaged,
Thank you Joachim

Sorry for my poor English
https://e1.pcloud.link/publink/show?cod ... uPJ5wK5vEX
Topic: Papilio machaonides | Author: daveuk | Replies: 15 | Views: 282
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Re: Papilio machaonides

by joachim » Thu Aug 11, 2022 11:28 pm

Jshuey wrote: Thu Aug 04, 2022 1:47 pm
joachim wrote: Wed Aug 03, 2022 11:42 pm Hello, this reminds me of an episode from when I was younger. It's all statute-barred....
We were on a trip through Florida, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. you are not allowed to bring live animals into the USA. But we had a caterpillar of machaonides that pupated during our stay. Well, how do you get the pupa through customs? We only had a few hours in Miami. My brilliant idea: I emptied a tube of toothpaste, put the chrysalis in it, and dusted it off. It worked perfectly, we landed in Jamaica and had a nice hotel. I took the pupa out of the tube and put it on the table in the hotel room. I hadn't noticed that she was already well developed.
In the morning I realised, overslept, the butterfly had hatched. When I tried to catch it, it fled out of the window, so there was a machaonid male in Jamaica. I guess it didn't have any effect on the fauna. Good thing it was 40 years ago.


So this male was caught years late....... It is not mine!
Hopefully you were young and foolish when all this happened. This is exactly the type behavior that results in invasive species introductions around the world. It seems a bit irresponsible to be making light of this.

John
Yes, I was very young and nowadays I wouldn't do it with the risk of spending a few days in prison if we were caught at the airport. But here in Europe we have so many invasive plagues, mosquitoes, gnats.....
My friend in the dom. Republic took a photo of Papilio demoleus in her garden. I was very surprised, but I heard that the species feels at home there and is now native.
Topic: Byasa impediens febanus | Author: daveuk | Replies: 3 | Views: 100
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adamcotton
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Re: Byasa impediens febanus

by adamcotton » Thu Aug 11, 2022 9:56 pm

Here are some photos of the nominate subspecies, not as stunningly coloured as ssp. febanus, but rather elegant too.

Image
Image
Image
Image

Adam.
Topic: Beautiful little Bloodsuckers | Author: boghaunter1 | Replies: 3 | Views: 42
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Jshuey
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Re: Beautiful little Boodsuckers

by Jshuey » Thu Aug 11, 2022 1:00 pm

I went to school with Bob Hancock, the researcher behind the video. Ohio State had a captive colony of these mosquitoes, and they were fascinating to all of us. Bob took it a step further than just saying wow!

John
Topic: Exploring Hemileuca eglanterina Country | Author: neominois | Replies: 6 | Views: 107
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eurytides
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Re: Exploring Hemileuca eglanterina Country

by eurytides » Thu Aug 11, 2022 4:38 am

John, just click on his youtube channel and you will be able to access all his videos!