Recent posts
Topic: Other People's Things.... | Author: Trehopr1 | Replies: 1 | Views: 30
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Other People's Things....

by Trehopr1 » Mon Feb 06, 2023 4:41 am

As a lifelong and steadfast enthusiast/collector with
a particular passion for most things Lepidoptera; I have
(thru time) come into ownership of other (caretakers)
beautiful and generally coveted winged treasures.

I thoroughly respect the hard work, dedication, and
passionate feelings put into what gave those former
enthusiasts purpose, enjoyment, and contentment.
I continue to treasure, admire, and be thrilled by
each and every gem that others once owned.

Though butterflies remain my favorite; moths have a
lot to offer so, I have picked them up whenever nice
examples present themselves.

Image

Image

Image

Image
Topic: largest moth wingspan question | Author: adamcotton | Replies: 11 | Views: 248
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: largest moth wingspan question

by Trehopr1 » Mon Feb 06, 2023 2:53 am

Hello John K.,
Thank you very much for posting that paragraph
listed in the book regarding the scanty information
available on that outstanding specimen once owned
by Oberthur.

To further back up the paragraph I believe I've found
an actual photograph of that exact specimen.

I have seen its photograph reproduced at least 2x in
Guinness record books. Once in a late 1970's edition
(posted here in my first photograph) with corresponding
information below the photo; and a second time in a
1985 (hardbound) edition with a (larger) picture and similar
information likewise noted.

1st Photo taken from late 1970's edition of Guinness:

Image

2nd Photo taken from 1985 edition of Guinness:

Image

My own personal thoughts on this mammoth specimen
are that Oberthur likely sold this specimen to someone
with money before his health went downhill. He was after
all a dealer on a big scale in his time.

It may still exist out there but, like rare, older automobiles
of low production or pedigree it has probably seen only 3 or
4 (owner/caretakers) since the Oberthur collection was sold
off and broken up in 1927.

And again, smart collectors REMAIN discreet about personal
"special things" which they have acquired; rather than advertise !
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Trehopr1 » Sun Feb 05, 2023 7:24 pm

Here I post the nicest looking artistic rendering
of this fabulous moth (that I know of). Some of
you may be familiar with the book it comes from.

Good artwork is hard to find these days...

Image
Topic: largest moth wingspan question | Author: adamcotton | Replies: 11 | Views: 248
AVATAR
boghaunter1
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 7:16 pm

Re: largest moth wingspan question

by boghaunter1 » Sun Feb 05, 2023 7:08 pm

Hello again,

From the 1982 book "The Guinness Book of Animal Facts & Feats", pg. 182. Quote...
"Chevalier Charles Oberthur, the French millionaire collector, once purchased a T. agrippina which measured an astonishing 360mm 14.17 in. across the wings, but the present whereabouts of this monster is not known. The Oberthur Collection of 1,140,000 butterflies & moths was sold in 1927 and 70 per cent of the specimens were acquired by the British Museum, but the superlative moth was not among them." Two other large specimens also mentioned in this book measured 304mm 11.97 (British Museum) & 281mm 11.06 in. (Dorman MUseum).

By the way, are there any biographical books on C.C. Oberthur? in English? I would love to find out more about him as he seems to have been in the same collecting league as W. Rothschild...

The above mentioned book is a really fascinating (& truly mind numbing collection!) of world record sized animals... each with it's own chapter: Mammals, Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians, Fishes, Echinodermata, Crustaceans, Arachnids, Insects (pgs 170-182), Centipedes & Millipedes, Segmented Worms, Molluscs, Cnidarians, & finally Prehistoric Animals. The book has a definite slant to British museum(s) records as expected. This book was published back in 1982 (252 pgs. total) & may be a bit dated, but is still, IMHO, one of the most interesting books I own. I haven't checked online, but it still may be available.

John K.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Trehopr1 » Sun Feb 05, 2023 6:33 pm

Indeed Dave, our hobby has certainly evolved in a pricey direction. 😩

You know if one could just stick to collecting only what you can personally find this passion wouldn't seem so expensive; excepting of course the cost of proper storage (drawers, tight fitting field boxes etc.)

However, once you have been bitten by the "exotic insect habit" it's hard to go back and be resolute in only what "you can capture".

Field trips abroad are now far too costly and complicated for most of us to endeavor in. Yet, one can still find nice exotic things at fairs, dealers, and at old collections being parted out --- so, all is not lost and one can still enjoy acquiring exotic things from far away lands we will likely never visit....
Topic: largest moth wingspan question | Author: adamcotton | Replies: 11 | Views: 248
User avatar
daveuk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:08 pm

Re: largest moth wingspan question

by daveuk » Sun Feb 05, 2023 6:26 pm

Trehopr1 wrote: ↑Sun Feb 05, 2023 6:18 pm A very nice comparison photo of the two dave. 👏🎉
I was very fortunate to land a pair of C. hercules back in the early 1990s. Since that time I have never again seen the species offered here.

The female that I have (spread like yours) has a wing expanse of 216 mm. That is a far shy (short) of the 290 mm reported by the Queensland museum. Could you measure yours (tip to tip) and tell me where you're at in terms of millimeters ?

I think mine is a pretty decent sized female....
Will measure my female tomorrow in daylight & let you know. Did not have time to visit the Queensland museum in Brisbane while I was there sadly.
Topic: largest moth wingspan question | Author: adamcotton | Replies: 11 | Views: 248
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: largest moth wingspan question

by Trehopr1 » Sun Feb 05, 2023 6:18 pm

A very nice comparison photo of the two dave. 👏🎉
I was very fortunate to land a pair of C. hercules back in the early 1990s. Since that time I have never again seen the species offered here.

The female that I have (spread like yours) has a wing expanse of 216 mm. That is a far shy (short) of the 290 mm reported by the Queensland museum. Could you measure yours (tip to tip) and tell me where you're at in terms of millimeters ?

I think mine is a pretty decent sized female....
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
User avatar
daveuk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:08 pm

Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by daveuk » Sun Feb 05, 2023 6:03 pm

Trehopr1 wrote: ↑Sun Feb 05, 2023 5:52 pm Very nice Dave ! 🎉👍
The larger of the two is very impressive.
I've not yet been able to land a good example. Over here, if people have them they may only have 1or 2 so, they generally won't part with them.

I'm bound to get a good one but, I'm certain I'll have to pay substantially more now that the prices on these and everything else has bumped up.
Thanks trehopr.
I know exactly what you mean. I paid five British Pounds each for these. They go for a lot more now.
I hope you manage to get one & it doesn't break the bank. Ours is by far from a cheap hobby these days.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Trehopr1 » Sun Feb 05, 2023 5:52 pm

Very nice Dave ! 🎉👍
The larger of the two is very impressive.
I've not yet been able to land a good example. Over here, if people have them they may only have 1or 2 so, they generally won't part with them.

I'm bound to get a good one but, I'm certain I'll have to pay substantially more now that the prices on these and everything else has bumped up.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
User avatar
daveuk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:08 pm

Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by daveuk » Sun Feb 05, 2023 1:09 pm

Here are my only two specimens of T agrippina
Both males (I presume) from Brazil 1985.
Shame about the broken antennae. They were in this condition when I got them.
Attachments
Screenshot_20230205_130323_Gallery.jpg
Screenshot_20230205_130323_Gallery.jpg (201.38 KiB) Viewed 90 times
Screenshot_20230205_130316_Gallery.jpg
Screenshot_20230205_130316_Gallery.jpg (246.42 KiB) Viewed 90 times
Topic: largest moth wingspan question | Author: adamcotton | Replies: 11 | Views: 248
User avatar
daveuk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:08 pm

Re: largest moth wingspan question

by daveuk » Sun Feb 05, 2023 12:57 pm

Here are my largest C hercules & T agrippina together for comparison. Both specimens from the mid 1980s
PNG & Brazil respectively.
Attachments
Screenshot_20230205_125339_Gallery.jpg
Screenshot_20230205_125339_Gallery.jpg (510.49 KiB) Viewed 63 times
Topic: Euthalia anosia | Author: daveuk | Replies: 1 | Views: 44
User avatar
daveuk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 8:08 pm

Euthalia anosia

by daveuk » Sun Feb 05, 2023 11:07 am

Euthalia anosa balina
A female & two males from Bali Indonesia
Attachments
Screenshot_20230203_100426_Photos.jpg
Screenshot_20230203_100426_Photos.jpg (517.25 KiB) Viewed 44 times
Screenshot_20230203_100438_Photos.jpg
Screenshot_20230203_100438_Photos.jpg (329.92 KiB) Viewed 44 times
Topic: From pinned to riker? | Author: akraider | Replies: 2 | Views: 57
User avatar
kevinkk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 175
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 5:06 pm

Re: From pinned to riker?

by kevinkk » Sun Feb 05, 2023 7:24 am

I've done it, I can't recall why, but the pin probably needs removed, and for that, I had to soften the area around the pin and use pliers to hold the pin,
and tweezers to push the body off, It worked 99% of the time without a problem.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
User avatar
Trehopr1
Global Moderators
Global Moderators
Posts: 507
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2022 1:48 am

Re: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by Trehopr1 » Sun Feb 05, 2023 2:13 am

Nice looking example. Looking more closely at your photograph it looks to be about 245mm. Your right forewing doesn't exactly line up underneath the zero (0).

This is a phenomenal species of moth which is probably most notable for its sheer wing expanse. Males typically fall (within the size range) of somewhere between 8 (1/2) and 10 inches wingspan when the trailing edge of the forewings are perpendicular to the body.

Females (start) at about the 10-in wingspan on up to 11 1/2 +. Their bodies tend to be heftier in build and because they carry the eggs their wingspan is naturally bigger for more lift.

The species seems to be fairly available. Specimens with an honest wingspan of 10 inches or more can get (very pricey) because of course, everyone wants the biggest example they can find. I have seen at least a dozen present in private collections here in the US but, most were (males).

The largest example that I have ever seen (personally) was a very impressive female measuring just over 11 (1/4) inches in the collection of Hermann Strecker.

If anyone does own a larger example than the specimen measured by Guinness; then I doubt that they would advertise it.

Some people are very reserved about the things that they own and simply don't feel the need to advertise (or bring attention to themselves) over any outstanding things they have acquired.
Topic: From pinned to riker? | Author: akraider | Replies: 2 | Views: 57
AVATAR
akraider
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2023 6:13 am

From pinned to riker?

by akraider » Sun Feb 05, 2023 1:25 am

When putting a pinned lep into a riker mount are there any tips or suggestions that I should be aware of? Any help will be greatly appreciated...thanks.
Topic: Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina | Author: joachim | Replies: 7 | Views: 136
AVATAR
joachim
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 1:38 pm

Does anyone have a bigger one? I mean an agrippina

by joachim » Sun Feb 05, 2023 12:29 am

I wonder if anyone has a larger one?
I bought this one once in the 70's at an insect fair for relatively little money. I think the butterfly is not rare.
https://e1.pcloud.link/publink/show?cod ... EDbB711axX

Joachim
Topic: Canada to US? | Author: livingplanet3 | Replies: 16 | Views: 621
AVATAR
Chuck
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 418
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 2:30 pm

Re: Canada to US?

by Chuck » Sat Feb 04, 2023 5:14 pm

kevinkk wrote: ↑Sat Feb 04, 2023 4:39 pm ..., seemed a little obsessive, ... collector had what must have been
thousands of Colias, ...
I'm struggling to think of something significant that was accomplished by anyone who was NOT obsessive.

As for a series of thousands...

The North American Lycaenid guys did some genetic analysis, and turned the field guides upside down. Now they're scrambling to find fairly common blues from fairly common locations; nobody had bothered to collect them because they were, for a century, just common blues.

I've caught, and raised, thousands of Callosamia promethea. So many would come to the lights that I'd take them around the dark side of the house and toss them into the forest, hoping they'd go away. I retained only a few that stood out as brilliant or different. Then one day I pulled out my Callosamia drawer- which held only a half dozen pair- and stopped: THAT is not promethea, that's angulifera. And I looked at the others- that wasn't the only angulifera specimen! So a month ago this came back to me, along with the fact that Saturnids have disappeared, so I dug out my papered specimens and sure enough, those I had from 1980s are ALL promethea. Unfortunately in a way, the papered specimens I pulled out were those that had been forgotten when I'd given away thousands of specimens to Cornell only three months ago. And in what I donated, I know for a fact that there were promethea...but I don't know if there were angulifera. Besides which I also have specimens I can't tell if they are promethea or angulifera, and all date within the past decade or so; the older ones are all promethea. So now I have to wait for Cornell grad students to set all those to figure out what the heck happened to promethea & angulifera in my area.

My research on Tiger Swallowtails in NY has well demonstrated the need for series. In examining three private collections from 1970s-1980s with 14,000 and 6,000 and 3,000 specimens respectively, each collection held but a dozen Tiger Swallowtails. Why? Because they were just Papilio glaucus, they were common. And not just private collections- institutional collections suffer the same hole. And the geneticists also were missing test specimens from NY/ PA/ CT, but had plenty from VA and MI. That's now taken care of.

My field work in 2022 yielded 84 local specimens. Half were frozen and went to the geneticists. The other half were set for morphological analysis. And what that revealed caused me to take my 2021 unpublished paper and throw it away. A series demonstrates consistency, but also outliers; add in the specimens I got in KY and PA and it becomes clear that oft-published morphological identifiers are not at all reliable.

So yes, there are a number of reasons to have a series. I never bought into keeping series, but I am a firm believer now.
Topic: Canada to US? | Author: livingplanet3 | Replies: 16 | Views: 621
User avatar
kevinkk
Premium Member - 2023
Premium Member - 2023
Posts: 175
Joined: Mon May 23, 2022 5:06 pm

Re: Canada to US?

by kevinkk » Sat Feb 04, 2023 4:39 pm

A long read Eurytides- interesting article. Clearly virtually every collector knows National Parks are off limits, as are state parks.
Interesting individuals as well, seemed a little obsessive, I recall seeing a program where a collector had what must have been
thousands of Colias, a single species, just case after case and on, of course, that was done legally, the point of interest was the
amount of animals . Seemed a bit pointless to me, having thousands of the same butterfly, and that's all he collected, there was
nothing else, at least they didn't show so on the interview.
Topic: Canada to US? | Author: livingplanet3 | Replies: 16 | Views: 621
AVATAR
eurytides
Posts: 115
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 1:36 am

Re: Canada to US?

by eurytides » Sat Feb 04, 2023 12:09 am

Topic: Canada to US? | Author: livingplanet3 | Replies: 16 | Views: 621
AVATAR
eurytides
Posts: 115
Joined: Tue May 24, 2022 1:36 am

Re: Canada to US?

by eurytides » Sat Feb 04, 2023 12:08 am

You are thinking of Mr. R. Skalski.