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Topic: A question for those who live in tropics | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 3 | Views: 21
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Re: A question for those who live in tropics

by Annarobertson1947 » Thu Jun 13, 2024 9:47 am

adamcotton wrote: Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:35 am It should be fine at least for a few months, probably longer. Humidity can only gradually enter a sealed wooden box unless you open it there.

Adam.
Thanks Adam, its going to not opened ,a back opening glass fronted display case ,glass is sealed as is back
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 26 | Views: 7521
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by wollastoni » Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:58 am

Congrats John and congrats to Mohamed and Nicolas for catching these !
A great collaboration of several InsectNet members ! I am very happy of that !

There are so many Hesperiidae and Riodiniidae in FG ! The diversity of these families in Amazon is amazing.

I would add that the Kaw Mountain is known for endemism (despite low elevation... there is no real "mountain", altitude max : 337 meters). The most famous endemic from there is Panacaea bleuzeni.

Last addition : it shows that when you let amateur entomologists do field work, science is progressing. A lesson to anti-science countries like Brazil...
Topic: butterfly identification (moth!) | Author: ramiroflores | Replies: 2 | Views: 22
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Re: moth identification

by adamcotton » Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:38 am

This is a moth. Maybe someone can recognise it.

I see there are at least 5 different places called Waterton in the USA, adding the State may be helpful.

Adam.
Topic: A question for those who live in tropics | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 3 | Views: 21
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Re: A question for those who live in tropics

by adamcotton » Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:35 am

It should be fine at least for a few months, probably longer. Humidity can only gradually enter a sealed wooden box unless you open it there.

Adam.
Topic: A question for those who live in tropics | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 3 | Views: 21
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A question for those who live in tropics

by Annarobertson1947 » Thu Jun 13, 2024 7:03 am

So, im going to Kenya, and i want to take a small collection with me of butterflies.
In an airtight glass topped case,sealed tight.
Will this suffice so humidity doesn't destroy?
Topic: butterfly identification (moth!) | Author: ramiroflores | Replies: 2 | Views: 22
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butterfly identification (moth!)

by ramiroflores » Thu Jun 13, 2024 2:40 am

Found this guy in Waterton
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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 138 | Views: 573174
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Wed Jun 12, 2024 5:55 pm

12june2024: 68F/ 20C, 80% cloud cover. First decent day after days of cold and rain.

Observed: 0

Saw a lot of nothing. Only the most common species and in single-digit quantities. The spring flowers (rose, berry) are done flowering, but the summer flowers haven't started. So there's not much for nectaring.
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 26 | Views: 7521
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by Chuck » Wed Jun 12, 2024 5:51 pm

^^^ I was going to post that today.

Very nice job. Amazing these new species were found in well researched areas.
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 26 | Views: 7521
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by Jshuey » Wed Jun 12, 2024 5:10 pm

The conclusion to my end of the story can be found here: THREE NEW SKIPPERS FROM FRENCH GUIANA IN THE GENERA EMMELUS, DAMAS AND METROCLES


https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... ESPERIINAE
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 138 | Views: 573174
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Tue Jun 11, 2024 9:02 pm

mothman55 wrote: Sun Jun 09, 2024 3:34 am In my experience most all the tigers in the GTA (Greater Toronto area) are glaucus. I personally have never seen a P. canadensis in the GTA.
I revisited this, and recalled that Paul had posted some wonderful photos of not-canadensis Tigers from Toronto here: https://archive.insectnet.com/thread/90 ... ger?page=4

I'm not buying that those are nominate glaucus. Though, the black anal band isn't wide enough for Spring Form.
Topic: Nectaring Sphinx | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 5 | Views: 137
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Re: Nectaring Sphinx

by adamcotton » Tue Jun 11, 2024 6:20 pm

Thanks for the interesting explanation. I can imagine that the open slope makes a good 'flight-path' towards the UV light for moths.

Adam.
Topic: Nectaring Sphinx | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 5 | Views: 137
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Re: Nectaring Sphinx

by kevinkk » Tue Jun 11, 2024 3:28 pm

adamcotton wrote: Tue Jun 11, 2024 10:45 am The second photo is a view of high voltage pylons in a pine forest. Perhaps you mistakenly uploaded the wrong photo.

Adam.
Actually that's the location the moth was taken at, I could have been more clear about that, it's east of home about 125 miles,
I've spent a number of nights there with the UV light, basically a big gravel parking lot, there is an access road with a gate for
service vehicles, it's a good collecting spot, we also spotted some Papilio eurymedon and Papilio zeliacaon, a couple skipper species,
Parnassius clodius, I've taken Sulpurs there and polyphemus as well.
I think the open area makes a flyway for butterflies, as they will patrol the edges as they fly along, all I need to do is sit, wait and hope
I am facing the right direction to see them coming.
Breitenbush Hot Springs is just up the road another 10 miles or so.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 138 | Views: 573174
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by adamcotton » Tue Jun 11, 2024 2:51 pm

By the way, in 2006 I photographed the type of Papilio canadensis Rothschild & Jordan, 1906 (data St. John's, Newfoundland 25.VI.98) in the NHM, London. I cannot post the photos here as they are copyright of the museum. The wingspan is just under 8 cm, with the lower edges of the forewings at 90 degrees to the body, spread in the modern style.

Adam.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 138 | Views: 573174
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Tue Jun 11, 2024 1:50 pm

11 June: Day six of rain. It's pouring, but not even on radar.
Topic: LepSoc 2024 Annual Meeting- questions | Author: Chuck | Replies: 1 | Views: 62
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LepSoc 2024 Annual Meeting- questions

by Chuck » Tue Jun 11, 2024 12:23 pm

LepSoc Annual Meeting is at Cornell 13-18 July, so I plan to attend this year, and have questions.

Specifically, the value (and opportunity cost) of the talks, papers, and poster presentations.

Cornell is "close" being just under 2 hours each way, so too far to drive every day. Lodging, meals, and parking are going to run about $170/day.

Worse, (1) my job which I love is very busy right now and (2) this is the absolute height of my field research season.

So I'm questioning the value of sitting indoors all day listening to talks and presentations. Yes, I'll learn a lot no doubt, and get to meet VIP Lep researchers. However, I'll die sitting indoors all day when I could/ should be out in the field (besides being unable to sit still for hours). And if the papers are like most of LepSoc Journal and News, I really don't want to hear about corn borers and Tortricidae and subspecies of Blues in California.

Appreciate any insights and suggestions.
Topic: Weird centipede(?), UK | Author: Jimbo86 | Replies: 2 | Views: 55
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Re: Weird centipede(?), UK

by Jimbo86 » Tue Jun 11, 2024 12:16 pm

On further inspection, I'm now wondering if it is actually just a common centipede (Lithobius forficatus), and the effects of death (turned from orange to brown and contracted to appear fatter) threw me off?
Topic: Nectaring Sphinx | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 5 | Views: 137
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Re: Nectaring Sphinx

by Chuck » Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:44 am

Great photo of the sphinx.

The valley with the pylons looks like every other valley with pylons, though I usually target those with deciduous trees. Except for the tree type, it looks the same as the place I was collecting Eurytides marcellus in KY a month ago.
Topic: Weird centipede(?), UK | Author: Jimbo86 | Replies: 2 | Views: 55
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Weird centipede(?), UK

by Jimbo86 » Tue Jun 11, 2024 11:23 am

I found this whilst doing some cleaning. It was (thankfully) already dead.
My first though was that it was a house centipede, but apparently these are really rare in the UK (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-n ... e-68055122), and the legs look to be too short.
Any other ideas?
It's just under 1 inch in length, and was found in southern England.
Thanks
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Topic: Nectaring Sphinx | Author: kevinkk | Replies: 5 | Views: 137
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Re: Nectaring Sphinx

by adamcotton » Tue Jun 11, 2024 10:45 am

The second photo is a view of high voltage pylons in a pine forest. Perhaps you mistakenly uploaded the wrong photo.

Adam.
Topic: Decoy for luring butterflies that like to mate and fight | Author: Chuck | Replies: 13 | Views: 401
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Re: Decoy for luring butterflies that like to mate and fight

by adamcotton » Tue Jun 11, 2024 10:42 am

Chuck wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 8:27 pm Now, concerning decoys, tests have demonstrated that Tigers do not differentiate, so the decoy should work for all taxa. If only we could get some decent weather to test it.
That would not surprise me at all. If I put a dead butterfly (pierid or papilionid) on mud it very quickly attracts a number of different species.

I hope you get good weather soon.

Adam.