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Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 142 | Views: 575489
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Mon Jun 17, 2024 5:45 pm

17june2024: Sunny, 88F/ 31C. Yesterday I was wearing fleece. What a change.
Observed: 2

Started at my secondary hilltop, where I spotted so many Spring Form. I can drive almost to the top, and it's flat on top. One flew across a forest trail, one I spotted about 300m away blasting along the edge of the forest. I do not know which taxon.

Then went to my primary hilltop, which I have to hike up to. Zero.

Milkweed is now about 10% in bloom. I remember from my mental notes that the MST population explosion happens about one week after 95% bloom (they delay feeding on the other nectaring plants too.) So figure maybe 1 week of blooms maturing, one week delay, that would put the MST explosion about 01 July- just on time (last year was late due to cold and rainy June.)

The Turtlehead is just about to bloom, MST will also use that early on.
Topic: Where did our Colorado members go? | Author: Chuck | Replies: 1 | Views: 47
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Where did our Colorado members go?

by Chuck » Mon Jun 17, 2024 3:06 pm

We had several members from CO that posted regularly, but lately, nothing. Anyone know what's up?

I'll be in Colorado Springs next week, wondering what's flying and where to go.
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 29 | Views: 8015
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by Jshuey » Mon Jun 17, 2024 12:57 pm

wollastoni wrote: Fri Jun 14, 2024 8:22 am John, I have 2 questions for you :

- The French Lepidopterist Association would like to publish an online article about these 3 discoveries on their website : https://www.lepidofrance.fr/
Could they use some of the article pictures ? They will put a link towards your researchgate article.

- The French Lepidopterist Association has published a list of French Guiana butterflies but excluded Hesperiidae due to lack of consolidated data. Could you help on that ? I don't know how big is your collection of FG Hesperiidae.
It is a big task as we have listed 1194 butterfly species in FG and there should be around 600 Hesperiidae species according to Daniel Lacomme.
Quick answers - Yes - of course you can link to the paper. As to contributing to the skippers of FG, I can help, but I really don't have that much material - perhaps 2-300 specimens total. And almost none of the little brown tribe Moncina are identified (saving these for my retirement).

Let me know how I can assist,

John
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 142 | Views: 575489
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Mon Jun 17, 2024 11:55 am

14 June 2024: 0 observed.

15,16 June: went north to the Lake Ontario shoreline area. Due to the cooling effect of the lake this area runs about 2 weeks behind my primary research area, and indeed the wild roses and berries are still blooming. Despite sunshine and reasonable warmth, 0 observed.
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 29 | Views: 8015
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by wolf » Sun Jun 16, 2024 7:33 pm

Thank you John. This has been a fun experience! :)
Topic: Tan caterpillar | Author: gry | Replies: 2 | Views: 38
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Re: Tan caterpillar

by livingplanet3 » Fri Jun 14, 2024 10:48 pm

gry wrote: Fri Jun 14, 2024 10:40 pm I think we startled this little guy in the mulch of my flowerbed. It jumped several times, so I have a picture of the topside and the bottomside. Green Bay, WI a few days ago.
It appears to be a Catocala (underwing moth) caterpillar -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/368

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catocala

Perhaps someone here can identify it to species. This genus has been a popular topic of discussion on this forum.
Topic: Tan caterpillar | Author: gry | Replies: 2 | Views: 38
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Tan caterpillar

by gry » Fri Jun 14, 2024 10:40 pm

I think we startled this little guy in the mulch of my flowerbed. It jumped several times, so I have a picture of the topside and the bottomside. Green Bay, WI a few days ago.
caterpillartop.jpg
caterpillartop.jpg (372.24 KiB) Viewed 38 times
caterpillarbottom.jpg
caterpillarbottom.jpg (413.95 KiB) Viewed 38 times
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 142 | Views: 575489
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by kevinkk » Fri Jun 14, 2024 3:58 pm

Jumped out? The windscreen and bumper used to be a good measure, I have settled for watching from the passenger seat to see if the collecting
trip we're making is futile or not, seems like things are slower this year, we were out the other day and only found Parnassius clodius, flying
everywhere in the rocky areas, and one lone P. eurymedon male. The flowers are blooming, foxglove, cow parsnips, bleeding heart, and others,
all there for nectar, but little to nothing flying so far, even the Oregon INaturalist site has few large butterflies so far.
Topic: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II | Author: Chuck | Replies: 142 | Views: 575489
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Re: Tiger Swallowtails of NY: Finger Lakes, Part II

by Chuck » Fri Jun 14, 2024 12:52 pm

13June2024; mostly sunny 82F/28C
Observed: 2

With local research giving up nothing lately, I decided to punch south into the hill country and toward the PA border. To do this, I elected to use the "Windshield Survey" method, in the truck at 50mph.

About 15miles SW of home a Tiger Swallowtail jumped in front of the truck. I was sure I got it, but could not locate it on the grill or in the grass. Ironically, this was in a spot I always thought should be good, but has always disappointed. So I got out and poked around, and saw...nothing.

I later saw another fly across the road 7miles SW of that position.

In between I took a dirt road up to an escarpment that's probably 400m or so above the valley. It was 10F cooler. Despite visions of Tigers puddling along the roadside like Canadians report, I saw nothing.
Topic: LepSoc 2024 Annual Meeting- questions | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 151
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Re: LepSoc 2024 Annual Meeting- questions

by Chuck » Fri Jun 14, 2024 12:47 pm

Thanks John. Sorry I'll miss you- again!

Yeah, I enjoy presentations and such...in Winter. This meeting is at the peak of my research season.
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 29 | Views: 8015
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by wollastoni » Fri Jun 14, 2024 8:22 am

John, I have 2 questions for you :

- The French Lepidopterist Association would like to publish an online article about these 3 discoveries on their website : https://www.lepidofrance.fr/
Could they use some of the article pictures ? They will put a link towards your researchgate article.

- The French Lepidopterist Association has published a list of French Guiana butterflies but excluded Hesperiidae due to lack of consolidated data. Could you help on that ? I don't know how big is your collection of FG Hesperiidae.
It is a big task as we have listed 1194 butterfly species in FG and there should be around 600 Hesperiidae species according to Daniel Lacomme.
Topic: A question for those who live in tropics | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 5 | Views: 141
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Re: A question for those who live in tropics

by Annarobertson1947 » Fri Jun 14, 2024 7:35 am

vabrou wrote: Thu Jun 13, 2024 4:53 pm Annarobertson1947
Your question doesn't require an answer from someone who lives in the tropics. I'm guessing what you want answers from someone living in areas of high or constantly high humidity, or high annual rainfall. I live in SE, Louisiana, USA, and here our humidity is nearly always 88-100%, and I am in one of the top three locations in the USA for high amounts of annual rainfall. Follow Adam's advice and never expose your dried specimens to outdoor humidity even for a few minutes.

But, even more important than humidity is your glass top case, and the serious destruction of your specimens because of the sun's ultraviolet degradation of all animate items. E.g. I have been a consultant several times over the past decades for museums and major large public insect displays. One, here in New Orleans did not follow my advice regarding exposure to uv light via windows of the buildings holding the insect displays, nor the problems caused by using high intensity, high wattage lamps in the display areas used by visitors. Yet, two years later 99% of all of the entire displays holding numerous thousands of insect specimens were devoid of any colors whatsoever, and ALL of the entire displayed insects were now permanently snow white (destroyed).

My personal research collection here 800+ glass top Cornell-size storage drawers which are stored in closed-door steel and wooden cabinets. This way, the specimens remain always in 100% darkness, except for the brief periods when specimens actually need to be exposed and viewed. And for these same reasons, is why all major museums worldwide long term store their once living materials in closed door cabinets.

Go ahead and use your display case, but consider encapsulating it in layers of plastic wrap or large zip-lock bags, and keep the specimens in the dark except when they need to be viewed indoors. High humidity will cause molds and fungi to grow upon any animate an inanimate objects.

While on this subject,let me toot my horn, here is one of my self-designed and self-constructed specimen drawers. I have designed and constructed over 600 of these over the past half century for my own needs. There are drawers available designed using aluminum instead of wood, using rubber gaskets, even nitrogen and other inert gasses filled drawers for storage of those irreplaceable one's of a kind, or now extinct specimens.

No, I never use space-wasting unit trays in my drawers. I'm self-funded and not that wealthy.
I do get your line of thought, agree fully.
I dont havecglass top as display, but to see specimens without taking out of secure case.
Im not one to pull specimen out to inspect up close.
Topic: butterfly identification (moth!) | Author: ramiroflores | Replies: 5 | Views: 81
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Re: butterfly identification (moth!)

by livingplanet3 » Thu Jun 13, 2024 5:16 pm

adamcotton wrote: Thu Jun 13, 2024 4:39 pm I suppose the obvious difference between the two is the two coloured antennae in Androloma maccullochii whereas the antennae of Alypia ridingsii seem to be all black from the photos in the link.
Also of note - A. maccullochii (shown below) has colored "shoulder pads" on thorax, unlike A. ridingsii.

Image
Topic: A question for those who live in tropics | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 5 | Views: 141
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Re: A question for those who live in tropics

by vabrou » Thu Jun 13, 2024 4:53 pm

Annarobertson1947
Your question doesn't require an answer from someone who lives in the tropics. I'm guessing what you want answers from someone living in areas of high or constantly high humidity, or high annual rainfall. I live in SE, Louisiana, USA, and here our humidity is nearly always 88-100%, and I am in one of the top three locations in the USA for high amounts of annual rainfall. Follow Adam's advice and never expose your dried specimens to outdoor humidity even for a few minutes.

But, even more important than humidity is your glass top case, and the serious destruction of your specimens because of the sun's ultraviolet degradation of all animate items. E.g. I have been a consultant several times over the past decades for museums and major large public insect displays. One, here in New Orleans did not follow my advice regarding exposure to uv light via windows of the buildings holding the insect displays, nor the problems caused by using high intensity, high wattage lamps in the display areas used by visitors. Yet, two years later 99% of all of the entire displays holding numerous thousands of insect specimens were devoid of any colors whatsoever, and ALL of the entire displayed insects were now permanently snow white (destroyed).

My personal research collection here 800+ glass top Cornell-size storage drawers which are stored in closed-door steel and wooden cabinets. This way, the specimens remain always in 100% darkness, except for the brief periods when specimens actually need to be exposed and viewed. And for these same reasons, is why all major museums worldwide long term store their once living materials in closed door cabinets.

Go ahead and use your display case, but consider encapsulating it in layers of plastic wrap or large zip-lock bags, and keep the specimens in the dark except when they need to be viewed indoors. High humidity will cause molds and fungi to grow upon any animate an inanimate objects.

While on this subject,let me toot my horn, here is one of my self-designed and self-constructed specimen drawers. I have designed and constructed over 600 of these over the past half century for my own needs. There are drawers available designed using aluminum instead of wood, using rubber gaskets, even nitrogen and other inert gasses filled drawers for storage of those irreplaceable one's of a kind, or now extinct specimens.

No, I never use space-wasting unit trays in my drawers. I'm self-funded and not that wealthy.
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Topic: butterfly identification (moth!) | Author: ramiroflores | Replies: 5 | Views: 81
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Re: butterfly identification (moth!)

by adamcotton » Thu Jun 13, 2024 4:39 pm

I suppose the obvious difference between the two is the two coloured antennae in Androloma maccullochii whereas the antennae of Alypia ridingsii seem to be all black from the photos in the link.

Adam.
Topic: butterfly identification (moth!) | Author: ramiroflores | Replies: 5 | Views: 81
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Re: butterfly identification (moth!)

by livingplanet3 » Thu Jun 13, 2024 2:40 pm

ramiroflores wrote: Thu Jun 13, 2024 2:40 am Found this guy in Waterton...
MacCulloch's Forester moth (Androloma maccullochii) -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/186568

Which is quite similar to Ridings' Forester (Alypia ridingsii) -

https://bugguide.net/node/view/39332
Topic: LepSoc 2024 Annual Meeting- questions | Author: Chuck | Replies: 3 | Views: 151
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Re: LepSoc 2024 Annual Meeting- questions

by Jshuey » Thu Jun 13, 2024 12:07 pm

I'm not headed to this particular meeting. But the reason I like to go to Lep Soc annual meetings in general is that you meet new and old friends and get to shoot the bull quite a bit. Yes, the presentations can be tedious at times, but you learn about "how" others think about problems, and see their solutions. I'm a big believer that imitation is the best flattery, and I imitate quite a bit.

The other thing to note is that there is a subgroup pf attendees who may hang around the edges of the meeting, but are really there to collect and socialize. This tends to be more pronounced at western US meetings, but you will still see moth collectors head out in the evenings, and even if you don't collect moths you are welcome and the conversations are great.

john
Topic: A question for those who live in tropics | Author: Annarobertson1947 | Replies: 5 | Views: 141
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Re: A question for those who live in tropics

by Annarobertson1947 » Thu Jun 13, 2024 9:47 am

adamcotton wrote: Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:35 am It should be fine at least for a few months, probably longer. Humidity can only gradually enter a sealed wooden box unless you open it there.

Adam.
Thanks Adam, its going to not opened ,a back opening glass fronted display case ,glass is sealed as is back
Topic: Hesperiidae from French Guyana | Author: wolf | Replies: 29 | Views: 8015
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Re: Hesperiidae from French Guyana

by wollastoni » Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:58 am

Congrats John and congrats to Mohamed and Nicolas for catching these !
A great collaboration of several InsectNet members ! I am very happy of that !

There are so many Hesperiidae and Riodiniidae in FG ! The diversity of these families in Amazon is amazing.

I would add that the Kaw Mountain is known for endemism (despite low elevation... there is no real "mountain", altitude max : 337 meters). The most famous endemic from there is Panacaea bleuzeni.

Last addition : it shows that when you let amateur entomologists do field work, science is progressing. A lesson to anti-science countries like Brazil...
Topic: butterfly identification (moth!) | Author: ramiroflores | Replies: 5 | Views: 81
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Re: moth identification

by adamcotton » Thu Jun 13, 2024 8:38 am

This is a moth. Maybe someone can recognise it.

I see there are at least 5 different places called Waterton in the USA, adding the State may be helpful.

Adam.